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Rozsa: Three Choral Suites / Kunzel, Et Al


Release Date: 04/26/2005 
Label:  Telarc   Catalog #: 80631   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Miklós Rózsa
Conductor:  Erich Kunzel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Mormon Tabernacle ChoirCincinnati Pops
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Works on This Recording

1.
Ben Hur: Suite by Miklós Rózsa
Conductor:  Erich Kunzel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Mormon Tabernacle Choir,  Cincinnati Pops
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1959 
Notes: Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio (05/15/2004 - 05/16/2004); Maurice Abravanel Hall, Salt Lake City, Utah (10/22/2004) 
2.
Quo Vadis?: Suite by Miklós Rózsa
Conductor:  Erich Kunzel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Mormon Tabernacle Choir,  Cincinnati Pops
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1951; USA 
Notes: Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio (05/15/2004 - 05/16/2004); Maurice Abravanel Hall, Salt Lake City, Utah (10/22/2004) 
3.
King of Kings: Suite by Miklós Rózsa
Conductor:  Erich Kunzel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Mormon Tabernacle Choir,  Cincinnati Pops
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1961; USA 
Notes: Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio (05/15/2004 - 05/16/2004); Maurice Abravanel Hall, Salt Lake City, Utah (10/22/2004) 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 comically bad music for pretentious films November 27, 2011 By William S. (Renton, WA) See All My Reviews "I've never understood Miklos Rosza's popularity as a film composer, particularly among producers. Though Bernard Herrmann was still alive, Harryhausen and Schneer asked Rozsa to score "The Golden Voyage of Sinbad", hoping perhaps for something reminiscent of "The Thief of Baghdad". The result -- unlike Herrmann's classic scores for Harryhausen films -- is instantly forgettable. Note, for example, the scene in which the statue of Kali comes to life. Harryhausen has given Rozsa terrific visuals, but Rozsa has no idea how to musically exploit them. The result is a "I can't write music, but if I could, I'd do a better job" reaction.

"Good tunes" /do not/ necessarily make for good film scores, but if you asked a movie lover to hum themes by Herrmann, Goldsmith, * or Williams, they'd have little trouble. Then ask them for something from Rosza. They might know the theme from "Spellbound" or "King of Kings" -- and that's it.

Rozsa's worst trait was writing down to the audience's lowest taste. This album has a fine example, the "Star of Bethlehem" music (band 2). You won't believe how kitschy it is until you hear it, the musical equivalent of a Thomas Kinkade painting. Feel free to laugh out loud -- I did. (The main theme from "King of Kings" is almost as poor.)

A film composer's lot is not an easy one. The restraints too-often seem to outweigh the opportunities. Yet a handful of composers has produced truly fine film scores of lasting interest. Unfortunately, Miklos Rozsa wasn't one of them.

* It's too easy to pick Herrmann, so let's use Goldsmith. How about the opening sequence of "Star Trek", as the Klingon ship approaches the energy cloud, and is eventually destroyed? Not only is Goldsmith's music exciting and memorable, but the sequence is well-developed, not just isolated bits of Mickey-Mousing. It could be played as a short concert piece, a "Beecham bon-bon", if you like."
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