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Mussorgsky Edition

Mussorgsky / Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Release Date: 09/24/2013 
Label:  Brilliant Classics   Catalog #: 94670   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Alexander WarenbergG. UstinovRaymond BonteEugené Bousquet,   ... 
Conductor:  Igor MarkevitchIssay DobrowenAtanas MargaritovEvgeny Brazhnik
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Leipzig Gewandhaus OrchestraORTF National OrchestraRussian Orthodox Cathedral of Paris Choir,   ... 
Number of Discs: 14 
Recorded in: Stereo 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

Mussorgsky, an "amateur" composer, was a great innovator of Russian music. He created an essential Russian musical language, in which folklore, Russian legends and fairytales played an important role. He wanted to free himself from Western classical and romantic traditions, and found a bold, raw, unpolished and passionate tone in his music, which speaks directly to the heart in its deep human emotions.

This is the most complete set ever assembled of music by one of the most original composers in the Western canon, whose bold synthesis of native musical and dramatic traditions with an entirely personal grasp of harmony and timing made him influential way beyond the slender size of his eccentrically proportioned and
Read more editorially complex surviving output, which took on huge importance for figures as diverse as Olivier Messiaen, Igor Stravinsky and Harrison Birtwistle.

The works which captured the public's imagination for their pictorial brilliance, such as Night on Bare Mountain and Pictures at an Exhibition, and in performances of authentically hard-headed brilliance, directed by Igor Markevitch. So too is his masterpiece, Boris Godunov, and in a legendary recording featuring perhaps the most renowned interpreter of the doomed and haunted eponymous tsar, Boris Christoff. But in many ways the songs lie at the heart of Mussorgsky's output, not least because they are our purest access to the composer's imagination, the larger-scale pieces sometimes needing and in any case receiving extensive intervention from later admirers and composers such as Rimsky-Korsakov and Shostakovich, who wanted Mussorgsky's music to survive way beyond his drunken and chaotic life.

Other information:
- Mussorgsky left many of his works unfinished, or even destroyed them. Several of his works were finished by fellow composers, who also took care of them in "improving" or "cleaning" the sometimes too original (for their taste..) writing.
- This set contains the three surviving operas: Boris Godunow, Khovantchina, Sorochinsky Fair, the complete songs, the piano music (of course the original version of Pictures of an Exhibition), orchestral music (the Rimsky-Korsakov orchestration of the Pictures).
- Excellent, mostly Russian performances by great singers like Boris Christoff (Boris Godunow), Nikolai Gedda, Sergei Leiferkus (songs), conductor Igor Markevich, pianist Alexander Warenberg (magnificent Pictures) and others.
- The largest survey of Mussorgsky's music on CD, the only Edition on the market!
- A worthy successor to the Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov and Borodin Editions.
- Newly written liner notes in the booklet.
- Booklet contains introduction to Mussorgsky and his music by Malcolm Macdonald.
- Sung texts and extensive booklet notes available at www.brilliantclassics.com.

R E V I E W:

MUSSORGSKY THE MUSSORGSKY EDITION Various artists BRILLIANT 94670 (14 CDs: 13:01:30)

The ancient Greek polymath Eratosthenes (c. 276–c. 195 BC) was nicknamed “Beta” after the second letter in the Greek alphabet, for supposedly being second best in many things but not the very best in anything. This latest Brilliant Classics collection fills that billing to a T (instead of a B); while none of the items included in it is a first choice, many of them are very worthy second choices that lovers of Mussorgsky’s music will want for their collections.

The contents of the set are as follows:

CD 1: Pictures at an Exhibition, Night on Bare Mountain (the 1973 Eterna recordings with Igor Markevitch and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra);

CD 2: Pictures at an Exhibition (Alexander Warenberg), 12 selected piano works (Nino Gvetadze in 10 of them, Vovka Ashkenazy in the other two from a CD in the Conifer song cycle listed below);

CDs 3–5: Boris Godunov (the historic 1952 EMI recording conducted by Issay Dobrowen);

CDs 6–8: Khovanshchina (the 1974 Balkanton recording conducted by Atanas Margaritov);

CDs 9–10: Sorochintsi Fair (the 1996 URAL recording conducted by Evgeny Brazhnik);

CDs 11–14: The complete songs (the 1993–96 Conifer series with Sergei Leiferkus and Semyon Skigin).

For a discussion of the first two CDs, I now turn this review over to my esteemed colleague and Fanfare ’s resident expert on Pictures at an Exhibition , David DeBoor Canfield.

The recording of the Ravel orchestration of Pictures derives from an Eterna recording made in May of 1973. Given Markevitch’s reputation as a conductor, it’s not surprising that his reading of Pictures would contain some things to commend it. But, alas, there are not many. I found his reading serviceable, but not inspired, there being numerous matters to quibble about. After a fine opening trumpet solo in the first Promenade, in measure nine the phrasing becomes a choppy and disjointed sequence of notes. This approach struck me as though Markevitch wanted to extract every ounce of the rough-hewn nature of Mussorgsky’s music. He carries this into “Gnomus,” wherein he has his string players remove the slurs from all the six-note figures that are heard in this movement; here the approach works somewhat better than in the Promenade.

The sound of the wind instruments in this orchestra strikes my ear as a bit strange and not particularly pleasing. The solo saxophone in “Il vecchio Castello” produces a sound that almost seems as though it was blended with that of an English horn, whereas the solo tenor tuba in “Byd?o” sounds, unbelievably, rather more like a bassoon. The oboe sounds rather tubby and inelegant throughout. I’m not sure how much blame to lay at the feet of the recording engineer, who has produced sonics that are no more than tolerable, and in several places (e.g., the beginning of “Great Gate”) distinctly bass-shy.

“Tuilleries” in Markevitch’s hands is much too relaxed, although his approach works somewhat better in the middle section of the movement, beginning at measure 14. The “Ballet of Unhatched Chicks” comes off better, but it’s hard to go too far wrong here, given the brilliance of Ravel’s orchestration, if one just plays what he wrote. “Limoges” has a good, lively tempo, and Markevitch pays close attention to dynamic subtleties, interpretively convincing me more than he does in most of the other movements. However, the Leipzig orchestra is ragged in a few places, including measure nine. The conductor also doesn’t stretch out the duration of “Catacombs” much: Most of the measures with fermatas are played almost in strict rhythm, which serves to downplay the timelessness of the tomb that Mussorgsky was seeking to portray. “Baba-Yaga” comes across as one of the tamer Russian witches I’ve heard. In the repetition of the “A” section, Markevitch changes the pizzicato in the strings to arco, an alteration I do not find compelling. Of the 300 or so recordings of the Ravel orchestration, this one ranks somewhere in the middle, easily exceeded by the interpretations (and oftentimes sonics) of Reiner, Szell, Toscanini, Cantelli, Jansons, Gergiev, and dozens of others.

Markevitch recorded Night on Bare Mountain (the Rimsky-Korsakov version) at the same session as Pictures. Oddly, in this piece, he seems to downplay the ruggedness of Mussorgsky’s (or Rimsky-Korsakov’s) score, but he does generate a good bit of excitement nonetheless, and masterfully winds down at the end of the piece. It’s a solid reading, but as far as I’m concerned the last word in excitement in any recording of this work is provided by Evgeny Svetlanov in his Melodiya recording. I do think that Markevitch’s version of Night is more competitive against the stiff competition than his Pictures, although the sound of the former still suffers somewhat from thin bass and less than clearly defined instrumental placement.

As for Alexander Warenberg’s reading of the original piano version of Pictures, recorded in 2000, little is to be found herein to attract the attention of Mussorgsky or Pictures enthusiasts. Whatever deficiencies are to be found in Markevitch’s recording of the Ravel orchestration, those pale in comparison to the ones of this pianist in the original keyboard version. From the opening Promenade, one hears a lifeless and plodding sequence of notes, bereft of almost the barest hint of any phrasing. “Gnomus” perks up a little bit, but Warenberg’s idiosyncratic sense of rhythm in this movement is distracting rather than suggestive of the misshapen gnome that Mussorgsky seeks to depict. Warenberg does possess some technique, as is clear from the clean articulation he brings to the very difficult concluding run. On the other hand, the much easier figure in measure 58 is completely fumbled, on the level of what one would expect from a rank amateur. “Amateurish” is also the word that comes to mind in the rendition of “Il vecchio Castello,” where the melody languishes in the midst of a shapeless assemblage of notes, and the pedal G? becomes monotonous because the pianist lacks the ability to shape it musically. The rushed final three notes of the third Promenade are clumsy, and “Tuilleries” fails to suggest rambunctious youngsters playing and quarreling.

“Byd?o” begins, contra Mussorgsky, pianissimo , but does succeed in building up to an impressive climax by measure 64. Warenberg ultimately fails, though, to evoke oxen straining under their burdens and succeeds in getting down only to a piano at the end of the movement, which the composer marks ppp. “Ballet of Unhatched Chicks” is interesting in its slow beginning and accelerando throughout the entire first section, but despite that, nothing in this movement sounds right to me, especially in the middle trio section, which falls far short of the required delicacy.

“Samuel Goldenberg und Schmuÿle” continues to demonstrate Warenberg’s inability to phrase musically, and this shapeless meandering continues throughout the fifth Promenade. The real surprise in this Promenade, though, begins in measure 17 and continues almost to the end of the movement. I really don’t know what is going on here: Either Warenberg gets lost and begins improvising, or he has decided that what Mussorgsky wrote was not good enough and attempts to “improve” it. If the former is the case, he makes it sound convincing enough that some listeners who don’t know the piece might well be fooled. But you need not take my word on this: If you follow with the score in this section, you’ll have great difficulty, as bits and pieces from various places in the movement are cut, pasted, and rearranged, seemingly at random. I suspect that the good folks at Brilliant Classics did not take the time to check this performance with the score, for had they done so, they could not have failed to catch this, as well as numerous other misreadings of notes and chords throughout the score.

In “Con mortuis,” Warenberg demonstrates just about the most uncontrolled and uncoordinated tremolo in the right hand that I’ve ever heard; whatever mysterious mood he might have been attempting to create, this gaucherie obviates it. “Baba-Yaga” is the one movement in the entire suite that I liked, at least to some extent. Warenberg makes the piece sound appropriately scary, although he completely misses the mark in measures 120–21, where the dramatic octave leaps on the E dyad in the right hand should sound like shots in the dark, but are barely audible here. In the “Great Gate” he obviously does not appreciate the difference between weighting chords and banging them out; unfortunately the listener will be subject throughout the movement to considerable pummeling of the keys. Almost as strange as the re-composition of the fifth Promenade is the pianist’s repetition of measures 107–110, putting the right hand up one octave on the repeat and adding additional chords in the left. This addition does not convince me; but then, precious little of anything else in this reading does either. Suffice it to say that no one should purchase this set hoping to acquire a first-rate, or even a decent second-rate, recording of this masterpiece. At least 300 of the 400+ commercial recordings of the piece surpass it, most by substantial margins.

So, you have my two cents’ worth for these three works, and I now turn you back over to my colleague, James Altena.

To Canfield’s excellent analysis, with which I entirely agree, I will only add that the Markevitch performances were previously reviewed (somewhat more positively) by Jon Tuska in 14:4 and Randy A. Salas in 18:1. The Warenberg was not previously reviewed. For Pictures , Szell continues to hold an honored place in my collection for the orchestral version, and Richter’s 1958 Sofia performance reigns supreme for the original piano version; as for Night on Bare Mountain (as translated here), I too endorse Svetlanov as a first choice.

To round out CD 2, a dozen of Mussorgsky’s piano pieces are included. The first 10, performed by Nino Gvetadze, were reviewed by Jerry Dubins in 33:4 on a Brilliant Classics release of recordings made in 2007–2008 that also included her take on Pictures . One is baffled as to why her performance of the latter was not included in this set instead of Warenberg’s; while Dubins gave it an unenthusiastic review, I can only imagine that it must be vastly superior to the disastrous Warenberg provided here instead. I do agree with Dubins’s brief comments on Gvetadze’s playing; these are competent but cautious renditions that do no damage but are unremarkable. The two additional piano pieces, performed by Vovka Ashkenazy (son of Vladimir Ashkenazy), recorded in 1993, were originally supplemental items on the fourth and last CD of the complete set of the composer’s songs issued by Conifer, also included in this set and discussed below. These renditions were briskly dismissed by James H. North in 21:2, and my comments regarding Gvetadze apply here as well. For those interested in Mussorgsky’s piano pieces, seek out the complete collection of them on two Danacord CDs from 2001 with Nina Kavtaradze, which offer characterful performances far superior to the tepid ones that Alice Ader recorded for Fuga Libera in 2010.

After this unpromising start, the remainder of this set is very strong. The classic 1952 recording of Boris Godunov has already enjoyed lengthy and excellent reviews in these pages from the estimable trio of Henry Fogel (8:1), Barry Brenesal (28:3), and William Youngren (18:3, a justly earned Classical Hall of Fame entry), so I will be brief here. Now that recordings of Boris are no longer rarities, this recording would, for several reasons—the use of Rimsky-Korsakov’s revision of the score, the omission of the St. Basil’s scene and assorted minor cuts in acts I and III, the monaural recorded sound (though excellent for its time), and the controversial and much criticized assumption by Boris Christoff of all three major bass roles—no longer be a first choice. For those desiring the Rimsky-Korsakov version, the spectacular Decca recording conducted by Herbert von Karajan remains the easy favorite; for Mussorgsky’s original the EMI set led by Jerzy Semkow is my clear preference, though the Gergiev set on Philips of both the 1869 and 1872 versions is very good and a necessary acquisition for anyone wanting both versions. That said, no one who loves this opera would do without this recording in his or her collection, above all for the commanding performances of Christoff (though virtually every role, great and small, is well sung). Issay Dobrowen—like many of the choristers and some of the vocal soloists, an émigré from the USSR—leads a dynamic account of the score with fine clarity of line and a great deal of forward impetus. While the chorus and orchestra are sometimes a bit scruffy, they sing and play with great intensity, and there is not a single vocal role that is not at least adequately cast. (Brenesal and Youngren expressed differing reservations over some of the male supporting singers; I have none there, but find all three female voices to be somewhat overripe and lacking in attractive sheen.) In sum, this remains an indispensable landmark in the Mussorgsky discography.

(On a side note, I seem to be in a very small minority of those who are not bothered by Christoff’s hat trick of singing Boris, Pimen, and Varlaam, for two reasons. First, I find that he differentiates his timbre for each role more than the objecting critics allow. Second, I strongly suspect that this was a practical decision made to insure the high standards of the recording. With the descent of the Iron Curtain a few years before, Christoff was to my recollection the only Slavic basso of international stature active in the West at that juncture, and the choice of other singers to fill the roles of Pimen and Varlaam would almost surely have compromised the quality of the execution of those roles. Financial constraints almost certainly dictated doublings of four pairs of secondary roles as well—not to mention that such doublings are likewise often a feature of live stage performances.)

The Khovanshchina featured here—like Boris, also in the now superseded Rimsky-Korsakov edition—is the 1974 Balkanton recording (misdated to 1978 by Capriccio and Brilliant) from Bulgaria. This was previously reviewed in these pages twice: first more briefly by Vincent Alfano in 10:6, who voiced a continued preference for this version of the score over the later and now standard one by Shostakovich, and then at much greater length by Daniel Morrison in 35:4. Morrison’s superb review should be mandatory reading for anyone interested in a recording of this work, so once again I will only seek to supplement that. In addition to covering the vexed textual issues regarding varying completions of the second and fifth acts, he compares this recording in detail to four Russian recordings on CD of the Rimsky-Korsakov version and to three CD issues plus one DVD issue of the Shostakovich version. (In addition, the 1954 Decca recording of the Rimsky-Korsakov version with the Belgrade Opera under Kreshimir Baranovich is now available from Naxos outside the USA as an MP3 download, and another CD recording of the Shostakovich version, a second Bulgarian production with several of the same singers as in the recording under consideration but conducted by Rouslan Raichev, appeared briefly on the Gega label.)

While the Shostakovich version is necessarily the preferred edition—unlike Rimsky-Korsakov he faithfully preserved Mussorgsky’s harmonies and melodic lines unaltered, and left the score uncut—the Rimsky-Korsakov one preserved here, like that composer’s edition of Boris , has its own considerable attractions in its brilliantly colored orchestration. In my view, this is easily the best recording of that older edition; unlike Morrison I find Margaritov’s conducting exciting from the outset, and the male singers far superior to their Melodiya counterparts on the Khaikin stereo recording. Of the two historical recordings Morrison mentions—both having serious cuts—the 1946 version with Khaikin is vastly superior to the 1951 remake under Nebolsin, where I find many of the singers to be intolerably squally. I also have not heard the surprisingly obscure and ultra-scarce 1988 Bolshoi recording under Mark Ermler, though the cast is virtually the same as in the 1979 DVD version conducted by Yuri Simonov. I would rule out the Ermler without having heard it, because by 1988 Evgeny Nesterenko’s voice was a threadbare ruin of its once mighty prime. Of the Shostakovich version on CD, either the Sony recording under Emil Tchakarov or the DG set under Claudio Abbado are preferable to the disappointing Philips set with Valery Gergiev; I slightly prefer Tchakarov, though I would never wish to do without the sublime ending to act V composed by Stravinsky that is utilized by Abbado.

(Another side note here. Morrison notes that Shostakovich’s own ending to act V is often criticized as being “contrary to Mussorgsky’s stated intentions and as giving too much emphasis to Peter’s ascendancy as a positive development.” Morrison defends Shostakovich’s musical allusion to Peter as simply reflecting subsequent history; I wish to suggest a different possible explanation. Shostakovich undertook his edition of Mussorgsky’s score in conjunction with a 1959 film version of the opera—a marvelous production starring the immortal Mark Reizen and conducted by the young Evgeny Svetlanov, that briefly appeared on the Japanese Dreamlife DVD label and should be acquired by anyone who loves this work. In line with the ideological dictates of Marxism-Leninism, the prolog and epilog montages of that film and accompanying narrative voiceovers implicitly promote the ascendancy of Peter the Great as a necessary stepping stone of Russian society forward, from its feudal past into a nascent bourgeois state that was the necessary intermediate phase before the workers’ revolution and the final emergence of socialism and communism. Consequently, Shostakovich was not free to follow his own inclinations here, but was constrained in the musical ending he could compose; it had to correspond with the propagandistic requirements of the film.)

Recordings of Sorochintski Fair (or Fair at Sorochintsk , as it is sometimes translated instead) are far more scarce—there have only been four to date, and all four until quite recently were out of print—and so the inclusion of one in this set enhances its value considerably. (One wishes that Brilliant Classics had likewise been able to license recordings of the operatic fragments Salammbô and The Marriage .) This performance is the fourth and most recent of those, a 1996 URAL recording with the following cast:

Cherevik, a peasant - Hermann Kuklin
Khivrya, his wife - Svetlana Zalizniak
Parasya, their daughter - Nadezhda Ryzhkova
Grits’ko, a young peasant - Vitaly Petrov
Kum, Grits’ko’s godfather - Sergei Vialkov
Afanasy Ivanovich, a priest’s son - Sergei Maistruk
Chernobog, a demon - Andrei Vylegzhanin
A Gypsy - Andrei Vylegzhanin

The three preceding recordings are a 1955 Philips set with the Slovenian National Opera conducted by Samo Hubad, recently issued on CD by Pristine Audio and reviewed elsewhere in this issue; a 1969 Melodiya recording with the USSR Radio Symphony and Chorus under the baton of Yuri Aranovich, which had its only CD release on a brief-lived Melodiya/Eurodisc issue in Germany; and a 1983 digital version on Melodiya/Olympia with the Stanislavsky Theater ensemble led by Vladimir Esipov, also long out of print. With the exception of Vladimir Matorin as Cherevik in the Esipov version, none of the singers in any of these four sets has any significant name recognition outside of Russia. Of the three I have heard, I would rank this one in second place. As all of them are atmospheric and characterful, with fine conducting and choral work, the differences come down to the singers. Those in the Aranovich set are acceptable but mediocre, though admittedly this is a work in which effective characterization counts for more than beautiful singing, and on that count the recording still succeeds. Here, the standouts are the Grits’ko and Parasya, but theirs are secondary parts. In the primary roles, the Cherevik has a slightly diffuse voice, while that of Kum is sometimes unsteady, and the Khivria is sometimes harsh and off-pitch, though those traits do suit her character. The big surprise is the 1955 Slovenian version, which features beautiful singing across the board and surprisingly fine sound in Andrew Rose’s exemplary transfer. Even if the Esipov version should turn out to be a good one, anyone interested in this opera should acquire the Pristine Audio set forthwith. For more general collectors, however, this version will do nicely.

This set concludes with the complete songs, in the four-CD series issued between 1993 and 1996 by the now defunct Conifer label, sung by Sergei Leiferkus with pianist Semyon Skigin. All four discs were reviewed by James H. North, in 19:1, 19:6, 21:2, and 21:3 respectively. He was quite impressed with the first release, but his enthusiasm cooled considerably with the three subsequent issues, stating, “Leiferkus is best at straight dramatic narration, weakest at character portrayal and humor.” Of course, any singer who attempts to tackle this repertoire faces comparison with the incomparable standard set by Boris Christoff with Alexander Labinsky in the classic 1955–57 EMI set. However, while I agree with North (in his review of Aage Haugland’s 3-CD set of the songs in 18:6) that whereas Christoff becomes the character in each of the songs while Haugland (as does Leiferkus) sings about the character as an outside observer, unlike him I more readily accept that as a different aesthetic approach that has its own validity and greatly enjoy the results on their own terms, even if I prefer Christoff. Leiferkus is in excellent form throughout, faltering only in the lengthy Rayok (The Gallery) from 6:06 to 7:06 where he unsuccessfully adopts a faulty method of vocal production in an effort at differentiation of character; Skigin provides discreet but supportive accompaniment. For those who find it makes a difference in their preferences, both Haugland and Leiferkus include a couple of songs that Christoff did not (Leiferkus has one unique item, The Nettle ), and Christoff sings the cycle Songs and Dances of Death and four other songs with orchestral rather than piano accompaniment. While Christoff remains sine qua non here, one certainly can’t go wrong with either Haugland or Leiferkus.

Brilliant Classics includes a booklet with notes on each of the works and complete cast lists for the three operas. For librettos to the operas and songs, it vaguely directs buyers to its general website. The exact link is brilliantclassics.com/release.aspx?id= FM00078537; then click on the “Download booklet” button. The 91 pages of text include the same booklet printed and provided in the box, plus (infuriatingly) Russian-only librettos for Boris Godunov and Khovanshchina and no libretto for Sorochintski Fair , with Russian-English texts provided only for the complete songs. This makes for a rather shabby addendum to what is otherwise an extremely attractive set offered at an unbeatable price. One could easily spend more for just the EMI Boris alone, and instead one gets excellent recordings of two more operas and the songs as well, with only the two renditions of the Pictures , the Night on Bare Mountain , and the 12 piano pieces being disappointments. Thus, while not unflawed, this set is highly recommended to all Mussorgskyans.

FANFARE: James A. Altena
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Works on This Recording

1.
Pictures at an Exhibition for Orchestra (orchestrated by Ravel) by Modest Mussorgsky
Conductor:  Igor Markevitch
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1874/1922; Russia 
Date of Recording: 05/1973 
Venue:  Leipzig, Versönungskirche 
Length: 20 Minutes 35 Secs. 
2.
Night on the Bare Mountain by Modest Mussorgsky
Conductor:  Igor Markevitch
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1866; Russia 
Date of Recording: 05/1973 
Venue:  Leipzig, Versönungskirche 
Length: 10 Minutes 24 Secs. 
3.
Pictures at an Exhibition for Piano by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Alexander Warenberg (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Russia 
4.
Boris Godunov by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  G. Ustinov (), Raymond Bonte (Tenor), Eugené Bousquet (Bass),
Stanislav Pieczora (Bass), W. Pasternak (Tenor), Nicolai Gedda (Tenor),
Kim Borg (Bass), André Bielecki (Tenor), Eugenia Zareska (Mezzo Soprano),
Boris Christoff (Bass), L. Romanova (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  Issay Dobrowen
Orchestra/Ensemble:  ORTF National Orchestra,  Russian Orthodox Cathedral of Paris Choir
Period: Romantic 
Written: Russia 
Date of Recording: 1951 
5.
A Tear by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Russia 
6.
Sorochintsy fair: Hopak by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Russia 
7.
Sorochintsy fair: Fair Scene by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874-1880; Russia 
8.
Scherzo for Piano in B flat major by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1858; Russia 
9.
On the southern shore of the Crimea by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Russia 
10.
Méditation by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Russia 
11.
Impromptu passioné by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1859; Russia 
12.
From Memories of Childhood by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1865; Russia 
13.
Ein Kinderscherz by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1859/1860; Russia 
14.
Au village by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Nino Gvetadze (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: ?1880; Russia 
15.
Near the southern shore of the Crimea by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879; Russia 
16.
Intermezzo for Piano in B minor "in modo classico" by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1860-1861; Russia 
17.
Khovanshchina by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Dimiter Petkov (Bass), Todor Kostov (Tenor), Ljubomir Bodourov (Tenor),
Stoyan Popov (Bass), Alexandrina Milcheva (Mezzo Soprano), Najejda Dobrianova (Soprano),
Milen Paunov (Tenor), Maria Dimchevska (Soprano), Dimiter Dimitrov (Tenor),
Nicolai Ghiuselev (Bass)
Conductor:  Atanas Margaritov
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bulgarian National Chorus,  Sofia National Opera Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1872-1880; Russia 
Language: Russian 
18.
Sorochintsy fair by Modest Mussorgsky
Conductor:  Evgeny Brazhnik
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ekaterinburg State Academic Opera Theatre Orchestra,  Ekaterinburg State Academic Opera Theatre Chorus
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874-1880; Russia 
19.
Songs and dances of death by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1875-1877; Russia 
20.
The nursery by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868-1872; Russia 
21.
Cruel Death: Epitaph by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 3 Minutes 40 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
22.
The misunderstood one by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 2 Minutes 12 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
23.
Misfortune by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 2 Minutes 37 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
24.
The Spirit of Heaven by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 2 Minutes 54 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
25.
Pride by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 2 Minutes 10 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
26.
Is spinning man's work? by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 2 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
27.
The vision by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 2 Minutes 43 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
28.
Trouble by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 2 Minutes 11 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
29.
On the Dnieper by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1866/1879; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 6 Minutes 10 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
30.
Eremushka's Lullaby by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 3 Minutes 57 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
31.
The feast by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1867; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 2 Minutes 37 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
32.
The classicist by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 3 Minutes 16 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
33.
From my tears by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1866; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 2 Minutes 29 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
34.
Sunless by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1995 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, Surrey 
Length: 19 Minutes 32 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
35.
Where art thou, little star? by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1857/1858; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 4 Minutes 3 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
36.
Night by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1864/1868; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 4 Minutes 30 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
37.
Hopak by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1866/1868; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 3 Minutes 39 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
38.
You drunken sot! by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1866; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 3 Minutes 19 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
39.
The orphan by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 2 Minutes 12 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
40.
The magpie by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1867; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 2 Minutes 10 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
41.
Child's song by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 1 Minutes 30 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
42.
The ragamuffin by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1867; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 2 Minutes 1 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
43.
Evening song by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1871; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 1 Minutes 12 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
44.
Gathering mushrooms by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1867; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 1 Minutes 43 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
45.
The wanderer by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1878; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 1 Minutes 30 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
46.
The garden by the Don by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1867; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 2 Minutes 30 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
47.
Hebrew song by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1867; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 3 Minutes 25 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
48.
Meines Herzens Sehnsucht by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1858; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 2 Minutes 49 Secs. 
49.
Ich wollt' meine Schmerzen ergössen by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1866; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 3 Minutes 23 Secs. 
50.
Méditation by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Russia 
Date of Recording: 11/1993 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 4 Minutes 2 Secs. 
51.
On the southern shore of the Crimea by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Russia 
Date of Recording: 11/1993 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 4 Minutes 9 Secs. 
52.
Near the southern shore of the Crimea by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879; Russia 
Date of Recording: 11/1993 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 3 Minutes 56 Secs. 
53.
Au village by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: ?1880; Russia 
Date of Recording: 11/1993 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 4 Minutes 31 Secs. 
54.
Intermezzo for Piano in B minor "in modo classico" by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1860-1861; Russia 
Date of Recording: 11/1993 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 5 Minutes 2 Secs. 
55.
A Tear by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Russia 
Date of Recording: 11/1993 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 3 Minutes 6 Secs. 
56.
Sorochintsy fair: Hopak by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Russia 
Date of Recording: 11/1993 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 1 Minutes 59 Secs. 
57.
Impromptu passioné by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Vovka Ashkenazy (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1859; Russia 
Date of Recording: 11/1993 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 3 Minutes 42 Secs. 
58.
The nettle mountain by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Semeon Skigin (Piano), Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/1996 
Venue:  All Saints' Church, Petersham, England 
Length: 2 Minutes 47 Secs. 
Language: Russian 
59.
Where art thou, little star? by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1857/1858; Russia 
60.
What are words of love to you? by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1860; Russia 
61.
The wild winds blow by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1864; Russia 
62.
The outcast by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1865; Russia 
63.
Tell me why by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1858; Russia 
64.
Salammbô: Balearic Song by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1863-1866; Russia 
65.
Sadly rustled the leaves by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1859; Russia 
66.
Prayer by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1865; Russia 
67.
Old man's song by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1863; Russia 
68.
Night by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1864/1868; Russia 
69.
Lullaby by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1865; Russia 
70.
King Saul by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1863; Russia 
71.
Kalistratushka by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1864; Russia 
72.
I have many palaces and gardens by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1863; Russia 
73.
Hour of jollity by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1858/1859; Russia 
74.
Dear one, why are thine eyes sometimes so cold? by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1866; Russia 
75.
But if I could meet thee again by Modest Mussorgsky
Performer:  Sergei Leiferkus (Baritone), Semeon Skigin (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1863; Russia 

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