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Leonard Bernstein Conducts Haydn


Release Date: 07/21/2009 
Label:  Sony   Catalog #: 748045   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Judith RaskinAlexander YoungJohn ReardonBernard Altmann,   ... 
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York PhilharmonicCamerata SingersOrchestra,   ... 
Number of Discs: 12 
Recorded in: Stereo 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

He has the same affinity for the composer that he did for Mahler: the music's energy, humor, and sheer emotional range played to the conductor's strengths, and no amount of foolishness about "period this" or "authentic that" can diminish idiomatic results that penetrate far deeper into the music's expressive essence than issues of performance practice ever can.

It would be wonderful to give this set a "10" but there are a couple of weak performances--Symphony No. 98 and parts of the Nelson Mass, for example--that preclude that. Still, let's not kid ourselves: there was no finer 20th century Haydn conductor than Leonard Bernstein. He has the same affinity for the composer that he did for
Read more Mahler: the music's energy, humor, and sheer emotional range played to the conductor's strengths, and no amount of foolishness about "period this" or "authentic that" can diminish idiomatic results that penetrate far deeper into the music's expressive essence than issues of performance practice ever can.

Many of these performances never have been surpassed: the Theresienmesse (with the LSO), many of the London Symphonies (Nos. 97 and 99 especially), and the entire set of Paris Symphonies. Bernstein's Creation is vastly more "Romantic" than we're used to today, and it suits this very romantic music extremely well--certainly better than his heavier remake. Sonically these recordings cover some three decades, from somewhat basic stereo (Symphonies Nos. 88 and 104) to good early digital (Theresienmesse). It's hard to believe that anyone who cares about Haydn (which is tantamount to caring about music generally) hasn't heard these performances, but if you haven't then this very reasonably priced 12-disc set is surely the way to go.

--David Hurwitz, ClassicsToday.com

3321740.az_HAYDN_Creation_1_Mass.html

HAYDN The Creation. 1 Mass in C, “Mass in Time of War.” 2 Mass in d, “Nelsonmesse.” 3 Mass in B?, “Theresienmesse.” 4 Mass in B?, “Harmoniemesse.” 5 Symphonies: Nos. 82–87 , “Paris”; No. 88; Nos. 93–104 , “London” 6 Leonard Bernstein, cond; Judith Raskin (sop); 1 Patricia Wells (sop); 2 Judith Blegen (sop); 3,5 Lucia Popp (sop); 4 Gwendolyn Killebrew (mez); 2,3 Rosalind Elias (mez); 4 Frederica von Stade (mez); 5 Alexander Young (ten); 1 Michael Devlin (ten); 2 Kenneth Riegel (ten); 3,5 Robert Tear (ten); 4 John Reardon (bar); 1 Alan Titus (bar); 2 Paul Hudson (bar); 4 Simon Estes (bs); 3,5 Bruce Prince-Joseph (hpd); 1 Camerata Singers; 1 Norman Scribner Ch; 2 Westminster Ch; 3,5 Natl SO; 2 London SO & Ch; 4 New York P; 1,3,5,6 SONY 748045 (12 CDs: 765:24)


This box is titled simply “Bernstein Haydn.” Is every Fanfare reader acquainted with their story? Just in case, I’m going to tell it again. In about 1950, H. C. Robbins Landon founded the Haydn Society. Roughly stated, one of its purposes was to put an end to the old conception of a comfortable, conservative “Papa” Haydn, as exemplified in Beecham’s performances and recordings. Looking back, we can now view it as the beginnings of period practice. According to Landon, Haydn was a great original, his importance on a par with Mozart and Beethoven, his music worthy of comparison with theirs. Over the next decade, a few conductors got it right: Hermann Scherchen’s 1950 Westminster recording of the “Military” Symphony was a best-selling blockbuster, although most of his Haydn recordings were poorly played by second-rate Viennese orchestras. George Szell in Cleveland produced a magnificent monaural recording of the “Oxford.” In the meantime, the young Bernstein built a reputation as a superb conductor of 20th-century music—as long as it was not too avant-garde. He was often reviled by critics for his histrionics on the podium and his overpointing of details in Romantic music, as if to say, “Notice what Brahms does here.” His Beethoven commanded general respect, but few recognized that he had a unique genius for Schumann. As for his Mozart, phew! People avoided mentioning his Mozart. He made his first Haydn recording with the New York Philharmonic in 1958 (see below), but nobody noticed. In 1964, Columbia Records released an LP containing two-year-old Bernstein recordings of Haydn’s Symphonies Nos. 82 and 83. Reviewing them in High Fidelity , Landon wrote, “Bernstein is one of the greatest, if not the greatest, interpreters of Haydn’s music . . . this new disc will eventually take its place among the great Haydn records of history.” And so it has, along with many other Bernstein Haydn recordings.


The succeeding half century has not produced a set of the “Paris” Symphonies that can match these six recordings, despite the seductive blandishments of period instruments. What makes these performances so special? Bernstein fully believed Landon’s credo; he (as he always did) restudied scores before every performance, seeking out the latest scholarly additions and corrections—typically those by Landon himself. By this time in his career, Bernstein had earned the love and trust of his Philharmonic musicians, many of whom would testify over the years to their devotion. He had crack woodwind players: Harold Gomberg on oboe; John Wummer on flute, followed by Julius Baker; Harold Goltzer and then Manuel Zegler on bassoon—the eternal Stanley Drucker’s clarinet found less opportunity in Haydn. Bernstein cut the string section in half (as he said at a Young People’s Concert, “I’m sorry, gentlemen, but you’ll have to go.”), allowing the winds to come through, yet leaving plenty of oomph. A note on the 1975 sessions for Symphony No. 98, which calls for nine winds and a timpanist, says “42 players.” His tempos were imaginatively chosen; his often-slow Menuets have a unique peasant stomp, his second themes a gentle swing. Putting it all together, Bernstein brought previously unknown levels of energy and intensity to Haydn symphonies, treating them as he would Beethoven.


Symphony No. 88—that rare Haydn symphony in which a smooth orchestral blend outweighs individual lines—receives a lovely performance, its soft, horn-soaked chords ringing true. In the Largo, the line never falters, at a very slow tempo. The finale is taken very fast; at one point the conductor steps up the pace another notch, catching his players by surprise for a brief moment.


The competition is strong in the “London” symphonies, but Bernstein’s performances of Haydn are always among the most intriguing, the most dynamic and intense. The “Surprise” Symphony’s opening Vivace assai is played slowly, with a unique gravitas, a seemingly odd approach that—through some Bernstein magic—produces a tender, sensitive result. The surprise chord in the Andante doesn’t sneak up on us; it is just plain ff . The repeated ff chords in the rest of the movement thunder with a towering rage, and the Menuet stomps heavily. The Allegro di molto finale boils along at terrific pace, bursting with joy. This is a wildly unconventional performance of this warhorse, yet one that thrills and satisfies.


Not every Bernstein Haydn symphony is ideal; his “Miracle” is rough and ready, lacking the elegance of the Concertgebouw under van Beinum, Haitink, or Colin Davis. Max Goberman recorded a superb No. 98, including the violin/cembalo duet in the finale, but his Vienna State Opera Orchestra (like Scherchen’s, third-string leftovers from the Vienna Philharmonic) cannot match the New Yorkers’ power and panache. This “Military” is a lovely performance, with especially enticing wind solos; the Janissary music (triangle, cymbals, bass drum) is not overplayed, as with Scherchen. The triangle rings its own miniature cadenza in the finale’s penultimate measure. The Andante of “The Clock” ticks sweetly and gently, interrupted by thundering fortissimos. Trumpets are prominent throughout the performance, so the wrong-note joke in the (very slow) Menuet’s Trio jars the ear as never before—or since. No.102, perhaps Haydn’s greatest symphony, receives it finest performance, beginning with an almost motionless Largo and ending with a lightning-fast, spectacularly executed Presto. Bernstein’s “Drumroll” doesn’t work for me; it lacks the panache of most of these performances, and this time a slow, heavily accented Menuet leans toward cutesy. No. 104, in 1958 the earliest of these recordings, is a good performance, but not one of special insight or character; Bernstein does not take the first-movement exposition repeat. A 1979 Philharmonic live performance in Tokyo was recorded by Amberson (Bernstein’s company) but never released. The New York woodwinds deliver consistently stunning playing throughout the “London” Symphonies, as they did in the “Paris.”


Bernstein does not play second repeats in the sonata-form movements of the “Paris” or the G-Major Symphonies (Haydn did not write development/recapitulation repeats in the “Londons”). In slow movements, he tends to repeat short (eight bar) sections, but not longer (16 or 24 bar) ones; but there are exceptions. Each decision sounds just right to me, which may be part of my satisfaction with these performances; or it may be the other way around—that I tend to approve of the choices because I admire the performances.


Comparing this issue with “The Royal Edition” of the “Paris” Symphonies (Sony 47550), I find that the slightly gritty strings have been smoothed and sweetened by some added reverberation. While the results may be easier on the ears, I think they do both Haydn and Bernstein a disservice, slightly damping the potent punch and swagger that make these symphonies, and these performances, so special. “The Bear” and “The Hen” were recorded in Manhattan Center, the others in Philharmonic Hall (now Avery Fisher Hall). Other Philharmonic recordings in this set come from those venues and from Columbia’s 30th Street Studios. Symphony No. 104 was recorded in the Grand Ballroom of Brooklyn’s St. George Hotel. Philharmonic Hall was widely damned for its dry, cold acoustics; although they damaged Romantic masterpieces—the heart of the Philharmonic’s concert repertoire—they suited both 18th-century and 20th-century music, which (in general) relies more on orchestral detail than on a sumptuous blend (Carnegie Hall is just the opposite; ideal for Brahms, it can swamp Haydn or Bartók). Unusually intense performances of the C-Minor and the “Miracle” Symphonies, from 1973 sessions at 30th Street, do screech a bit, and No. 97 is overly reverberant (the acoustic at 30th Street seems to have been adjustable), missing the mighty blaze of Szell’s opening Vivace. The “Military,” in Philharmonic Hall, has seldom sounded so sweet and fresh.


The “Nelson” Mass fared less well; the 1976 Manhattan Center recording was dry and cramped on LP. It sounds as if much processing was done for a 1992 issue, Sony 47563, and that issue is recycled here. It still doesn’t work; additional reverberance opens up the sonic stage, but interferes with the music. The chorus benefits, but the orchestra is clouded, and the badly miked soloists are nearly inaudible at p . Tempos run from very fast to very slow; both extremes trouble the soloists. A decent recording might have allowed us to better judge what Bernstein was trying to do—a similar performance thrilled in concert. The 1973 “Harmoniemesse”—from the same venue—sounds very much better; the recording is bright, incisive, and well balanced. The solo quartet (Blegen, von Stade, Riegel, Estes) sings well and blends beautifully, the Westminster Choir is marvelous, and Bernstein is at the top of his form, leading a dynamic, dramatic performance (Haydn’s late Masses, as devout as he was, are more choral/symphonic showpieces than humble paeans to God). There have been several superb recordings of this work—my favorite is by Richard Hickox’s Collegium Musicum 90 on Chandos—but Bernstein’s is the finest modern-instrument one.


This recording of the “Mass in Time of War” is a story in itself. On the eve of Richard Nixon’s inauguration to a second term as president—at the height of the Vietnam War—the official concert in Washington’s Constitution Hall had the Philadelphia Orchestra playing the “1812” Overture, a celebration of war. Bernstein and others organized an alternative “Concert for Peace” at Washington’s National Cathedral. It featured this Mass, which protests against war. It was to be on the radio, but rumors flew that the broadcast would somehow be prevented; I listened, and, sure enough, it was cut off in midstream. The following morning, the participants reassembled at the Cathedral and made this recording. Seven days later, the United States signed a peace agreement. The performance is a moving one—the recording quality reverberant, yet acceptable. One may find better performances in the catalog, but none more impassioned, none that have the emotional reverberance of this one for those who were there, if only in front of the radio.


The “Theresienmesse,” recorded in London’s Henry Wood Hall in 1979, is the only digital recording in this set. Bernstein had mellowed—with age, without the New York Philharmonic or Vietnam, and for the least boisterous of Haydn’s late Masses. Every element of the performance is excellent: soloists Popp, Elias, Tear, and Hudson, the London Symphony Orchestra, and its Chorus. That they do not coalesce into a successful recording is due primarily to the gritty, harsh sound of the very early digital recording; it has little life, little presence. The soloists suffer the most, as some obviously well sung phrases turn ugly. Given the sophisticated computer algorithms used to restore historical recordings today, one would think it would be simple to generate the missing digital bits, but this CD sounds just like the original LP.


The Creation is given a slow, heavy, overpowering performance; Bernstein is more up-tempo in the big ensembles—orchestra, soloists, and chorus—which are reminiscent of Beethoven’s Ninth. Each of the three parts end in a blaze of glory, with a very fast finale, again reminding one of the Ninth. The soloists are in good voice and sing well, although Reardon’s strong baritone dries on the lowest notes, which need at least a bass baritone. The recorded sound, from Philharmonic Hall in 1966, tends to be loud and blatant. The performance does contain some of Bernstein’s energy and personal magic, even at slow tempos, but it is not competitive with such marvelous recordings as Marriner on EMI (modern instruments, with Bonney, Blochwitz, and Rootering) and—better yet—Thomas Hengelbrock’s period ensemble on Deutsche Harmonia Mundi, with the magnificent Simone Kermes.


These are all of Haydn’s works that Bernstein recorded for Columbia/CBS/Sony, but he re-recorded Symphony No.102 with the Philharmonic at 30th Street on April 3, 1976. That recording has never been released, perhaps because the 1962 one was perfect in every way. It would have made an interesting bonus here, filling out the 43-minute final CD. Even better would have been a recording that Columbia scheduled but never made, the Sinfonia concertante in B?. The February 1, 1959, broadcast with John Corigliano, Laszlo Vargas, Gomberg, and Zegler suggests that this could have been the definitive recording of a marvelous work that has never been just right on recordings, not even Bernstein’s performance with the Vienna Philharmonic on Deutsche Grammophon.


A 24-page booklet contains the essential identification, tracking, and discographic information; there are no program notes or vocal texts. While Avery Fisher Hall is properly conjoined with Philharmonic Hall, original releases are credited to “Sony Music Entertainment,” which is a falsehood: that is a current corporate title that seems to change every other year; these performances were recorded and first released by Columbia Records, the “Theresienmesse” by CBS Masterworks. The one-and-three-quarter-inches box (nearly the size of Sony’s 22-CD Stravinsky set) contains six slick-cardboard folders that each hold from one to three discs. The fit is tight, which means that fingers must squeeze the playing side of a disc to remove it. Twelve plain paper envelopes in a box half the size would have been preferable—the people who decide such matters are never the ones who will use the product every day. These are minor complaints, however, considering the magnificent music and music-making to be found in this box. Of the 26 recordings here, only about a half dozen are less than wonderful. This set is a prime recommendation to anyone listening to Haydn, from the freshest newcomer to the most experienced, devoted Haydn scholar.


FANFARE: James H. North
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Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony no 82 in C major, H 1 no 82 "The Bear" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 5/7/1962 
Venue:  Manhattan Center, New York City 
2.
Symphony no 83 in G minor, H 1 no 83 "The Hen" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1785; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 4/9/1962 
Venue:  Manhattan Center, New York City 
3.
Symphony no 84 in E flat major, H 1 no 84 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 5/20/1966 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
4.
Symphony no 85 in B flat major, H 1 no 85 "La Reine" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1785; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 5/20/1966 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
5.
Symphony no 86 in D major, H 1 no 86 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 3/7/1967 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
6.
Symphony no 87 in A major, H 1 no 87 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1785; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 3/21/1967 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
7.
Symphony no 88 in G major, H 1 no 88 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: circa 1787 ; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 1/7/1963 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
8.
Symphony no 93 in D major, H 1 no 93 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; London, England 
Date of Recording: 12/7/1971 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
9.
Symphony no 94 in G major, H 1 no 94 "Surprise" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; London, England 
Date of Recording: 12/16/1971 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
10.
Symphony no 95 in C minor, H 1 no 95 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; London, England 
Date of Recording: 2/12/1973 
Venue:  30th Street Studio, New York City 
11.
Symphony no 96 in D major, H 1 no 96 "Miracle" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; London, England 
Date of Recording: 3/5/1973 
Venue:  30th Street Studio, New York City 
12.
Symphony no 97 in C major, H 1 no 97 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1792; London, England 
Date of Recording: 4/10/1975 
Venue:  30th Street Studio, New York City 
13.
Symphony no 98 in B flat major, H 1 no 98 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1792; London, England 
Date of Recording: 4/10/1975 
Venue:  30th Street Studio, New York City 
14.
Symphony no 99 in E flat major, H 1 no 99 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 10/20/1970 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
15.
Symphony no 100 in G major, H 1 no 100 "Military" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793-1794; London, England 
Date of Recording: 10/20/1970 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
16.
Symphony no 101 in D major, H 1 no 101 "Clock" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793-1794; London, England 
Date of Recording: 2/12/1970 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
17.
Symphony no 102 in B flat major, H 1 no 102 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1794; London, England 
Date of Recording: 10/31/1962 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
18.
Symphony no 103 in E flat major, H 1 no 103 "Drumroll" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795; London, England 
Date of Recording: 2/10/1970 
Venue:  Philharmonic Hall, New York City 
19.
Symphony no 104 in D major, H 1 no 104 "London" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795; London, England 
Date of Recording: 1/27/1958 
Venue:  St. George Hotel, Brooklyn, NY 
20.
The Creation, H 21 no 2 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Judith Raskin (Soprano), Alexander Young (Tenor), John Reardon (Baritone),
Bernard Altmann (Cello), Bruce Prince-Joseph (Harpsichord)
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic,  Camerata Singers
Period: Classical 
Written: 1796-1798; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 5/17/1966 
Venue:  Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center, NY 
Length: 103 Minutes 0 Secs. 
21.
Mass in B flat major, H 22 no 14 "Harmoniemesse" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Simon Estes (Bass), Frederica Von Stade (Mezzo Soprano), Kenneth Riegel (Tenor),
Judith Blegen (Soprano)
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic,  Camerata Singers
Period: Classical 
Written: 1802; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 02/19/1973 
Venue:  Manhattan Center, New York City 
Length: 43 Minutes 0 Secs. 
22.
Missa in tempore belli, H 22 no 9 "Paukenmesse" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Alan Titus (Baritone), Gwendolyn Killebrew (Mezzo Soprano), Michael Devlin (Bass Baritone),
Patricia Wells (Soprano)
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Orchestra,  Norman Scribner Choir
Period: Classical 
Written: 1796; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 01/20/1973 
Venue:  Live Washington Cathedral, Washington D 
Length: 43 Minutes 52 Secs. 
Language: Latin 
23.
Mass in D minor, H 22 no 11 "Nelsonmesse" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Simon Estes (Bass), Gwendolyn Killebrew (Mezzo Soprano), Kenneth Riegel (Tenor),
Judith Blegen (Soprano)
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic,  Westminster Choir
Period: Classical 
Written: 1798; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 12/20/1976 
Venue:  Manhattan Center, New York City 
Length: 44 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: Latin 
24.
Mass in B flat major, H 22 no 12 "Theresien-Messe" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Paul Hudson (Bass), Rosalind Elias (Mezzo Soprano), Robert Tear (Tenor),
Lucia Popp (Soprano)
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Symphony Orchestra,  London Symphony Chorus
Period: Classical 
Written: 1799; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 05/1979 
Venue:  Henry Wood Hall, London 
Length: 43 Minutes 8 Secs. 

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