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Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, Bach, Brahms, Etc: Violin Concertos / Oistrakh, Hagen, Zukermann, Et Al


Release Date: 10/28/2008 
Label:  Profil   Catalog #: 8076   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Franz Joseph HaydnWolfgang Amadeus MozartMichael HaydnJohann Sebastian Bach,   ... 
Performer:  Lukas HagenDavid OistrakhRoland GreutterRuggiero Ricci,   ... 
Conductor:  Lukas HagenFranz KonwitschnyGünter WandVolker Hartung,   ... 
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camerata SalzburgDresden StaatskapelleNorth German Radio Symphony Orchestra,   ... 
Number of Discs: 2 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 2 Hours 20 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews

"Throughout the 18th century, Italian violinists sought fame and fortune—either as traveling virtuosos or as part of an established musical organization further north. Two of the works on this CD were penned for such musicians, both of whom were active in Classical-era Austria. Initially, violin concertos of the period tended to be lighter fare, but in the wake of the publication of Leopold Mozart’s Treatise on the Fundamental Principles of Violin Playing (1756), things began to change rapidly. The elder Mozart based the primer on his knowledge of the technique of virtuosos like Geminiani and Tartini; it also reflected current thoughts on music. Thus Leopold Mozart was a sort of musical bridge between the Italian and South German Read more schools of violin-playing as well as composition. A number of composers wrote concertos that would also bridge the gap between the virtuoso traditions of the Italian Baroque and what would later be identified as Classicism and reach its epitome in the music of Joseph Haydn and Mozart.

We don’t normally think of Joseph Haydn as a composer of concertos, but he did write several for piano, two or three for organ, two for horn, one for trumpet, and four for violin. Concerning the violin concertos, one is lost; it is known only from an entry in Haydn’s thematic catalog. The remaining three were unpublished until the last century. Like its companions, the Violin Concerto in G was composed for Luigi Tomasini, who joined the orchestra at Esterházy in 1757 and was promoted to concertmaster in 1759. A violinist friend tells me this is the easiest of the Haydn concertos to perform, since it seldom passes the third position on the instrument. The concerto is also somewhat anachronistic, in that some of the figurations (triplets, trills, etc.) recall the gallant style and in particular invoke the spirit of Tartini.

As for Michael Haydn’s Concerto, it was once attributed to his older brother and dates from 1760, when the younger Haydn was active in Salzburg as a member of Archbishop’s ensemble. The Concerto is a charming work that in some ways is a musical contradiction, as it straddles the fence between the Baroque and Classical eras. Like the Concerto of his older brother, Michael’s work is more gallant in nature than Classical, but the finale is remarkable for its time, as the principle theme of the opening tutti suddenly becomes the accompaniment to the melody when the soloist first enters. There is no question, though, that the finale is a bang-up piece of musical braggadocio, filled with the fire and brimstone representative of the Classical concerto.

The Camerata Salzburg is far from a collection of novice performers. The orchestra was founded in the early 1950s by Bernard Paumgartner; following his death, the reins were held by Sándor Végh from 1978 until his death in 1997. According to annotator Wolfgang Teubner, this ensemble of young and highly motivated musicians from two-dozen countries represents “a mirror image of their cultures merged into the universal language of music.” The orchestra presents more than 80 privately funded concerts annually.

Lukas Hagen, who is a native of Salzburg, has been first violinist in the Hagen Quartet since 1981, led the Chamber Orchestra of Europe for seven years, and has been heard and critically acclaimed the world over. It’s perfectly clear from his first entry that this is music dear to Hagen’s heart and that he knows it forward and backward, inside and out. Hagen provides intensity and spontaneity, and plays with generous tonal beauty, pleading the case of this repertoire quite well. Camerata Salzburg provides Hagen with ideal support; one can’t help but appreciate their exceptional understanding of and excellent feel for the music. This well-recorded release draws further kudos for the apparently unerring art of Profil’s founder, Gunther Hänssler." FANFARE: Michael Carter
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Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for Violin no 4 in G major, H 7a no 4 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Lukas Hagen (Violin)
Conductor:  Lukas Hagen
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camerata Salzburg
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1769; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Length: 20 Minutes 29 Secs. 
2.
Concerto for Violin no 5 in A major, K 219 "Turkish": 2nd movement, Adagio by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  David Oistrakh (Violin)
Conductor:  Franz Konwitschny
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Dresden Staatskapelle
Period: Classical 
Written: 1775; Salzburg, Austria 
Length: 9 Minutes 28 Secs. 
3.
Concerto for Violin no 5 in A major, K 219 "Turkish": 3rd movement, Rondeau by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  David Oistrakh (Violin)
Conductor:  Franz Konwitschny
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Dresden Staatskapelle
Period: Classical 
Written: 1775; Salzburg, Austria 
Length: 11 Minutes 2 Secs. 
4.
Concerto for Violin in B flat major, P 53 by Michael Haydn
Performer:  Lukas Hagen (Violin)
Conductor:  Lukas Hagen
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camerata Salzburg
Period: Classical 
Written: 1760; Austria 
Length: 23 Minutes 15 Secs. 
5.
Concerto for Violin no 1 in A minor, BWV 1041: 3rd movement, Allegro by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Roland Greutter (Violin)
Conductor:  Günter Wand
Orchestra/Ensemble:  North German Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1723; Cöthen, Germany 
Length: 3 Minutes 52 Secs. 
6.
Concerto for Violin in D minor, BWV 1052 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Volker Hartung
Orchestra/Ensemble:  St. Petersburg Chamber Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1738-1739; Leipzig, Germany 
Length: 14 Minutes 47 Secs. 
7.
Concerto for Violin in E minor, Op. 64: 1st movement, Allegro molto appassionato by Felix Mendelssohn
Conductor:  Carlo Maria Giulini
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1844; Germany 
Length: 13 Minutes 21 Secs. 
8.
Concerto for Violin no 3 in B minor, Op. 61: 1st movement, Allegro non troppo by Camille Saint-Saëns
Performer:  Ruggiero Ricci (Violin)
Conductor:  Günter Wand
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; France 
Length: 8 Minutes 13 Secs. 
9.
Concerto for Violin no 3 in B minor, Op. 61: 2nd movement, Andantino quasi allegretto by Camille Saint-Saëns
Performer:  Ruggiero Ricci (Violin)
Conductor:  Günter Wand
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; France 
Length: 7 Minutes 53 Secs. 
10.
Concerto for Violin in D major, Op. 35: 2nd movement, Andante by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Performer:  David Oistrakh (Violin)
Conductor:  Franz Konwitschny
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Dresden Staatskapelle
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1878; Russia 
Length: 5 Minutes 40 Secs. 
11.
Concerto for Violin and Cello in A minor, Op. 102 "Double": 2nd movement, Andante by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Antonio Meneses (Cello), Thomas Zehetmair (Violin)
Conductor:  Kurt Sanderling
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne West German Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1887; Austria 
Length: 7 Minutes 39 Secs. 
12.
Concerto for Violin and Cello in A minor, Op. 102 "Double": 3rd movement, Vivace non troppo by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Antonio Meneses (Cello), Thomas Zehetmair (Violin)
Conductor:  Kurt Sanderling
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne West German Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1887; Austria 
Length: 9 Minutes 10 Secs. 
13.
Concerto for Violin no 1 in A minor, BWV 1041: 1st movement, Allegro moderato by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Roland Greutter (Violin)
Conductor:  Günter Wand
Orchestra/Ensemble:  North German Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1723; Cöthen, Germany 
Length: 4 Minutes 1 Secs. 

Sound Samples

Violin Concerto in G major, Hob.VIIa:4: I. Allegro moderato
Violin Concerto in G major, Hob.VIIa:4: II. Adagio
Violin Concerto in G major, Hob.VIIa:4: III. Allegro
Violin Concerto No. 5 in A major, K. 219, "Turkish": II. Adagio
Violin Concerto No. 5 in A major, K. 219, "Turkish": III. Tempo di menuetto
Violin Concerto in B flat major, P. 53: I. Allegro moderato
Violin Concerto in B flat major, P. 53: II. Adagio
Violin Concerto in B flat major, P. 53: III. Allegro molto
Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041: I. Tempo ordinario
Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041: III. Allegro assai
Concerto for 2 Violins in D minor, BWV 1043: I. Vivace
Concerto for 2 Violins in D minor, BWV 1043: II. Largo ma non tanto
Concerto for 2 Violins in D minor, BWV 1043: III. Allegro
Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64: I. Allegro molto appassionato
Double Concerto for Violin and Cello in A minor, Op. 102: II. Andante
Double Concerto for Violin and Cello in A minor, Op. 102: III. Vivace non troppo
Violin Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op. 61: I. Allegro non troppo
Violin Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op. 61: II. Andantino quasi allegretto
Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35: II. Canzonetta: Andante

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