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Szymon Goldberg Centenary Edition Vol 1 - Non-commercial Recordings

Bach / Beethoven / Schumann / Goldberg
Release Date: 08/11/2009 
Label:  Music & Arts   Catalog #: 1223   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Franz SchubertRobert SchumannClaude DebussyAntonín Dvorák,   ... 
Performer:  Szymon GoldbergArtur BalsamZara NelsovaVictor Babin,   ... 
Conductor:  Szymon GoldbergGerhard SamuelEduard Van BeinumDimitri Mitropoulos,   ... 
Number of Discs: 8 
Length: 9 Hours 31 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews



SZYMON GOLDBERG CENTENARY, VOL. 1—NON-COMMERCIAL RECORDINGS Szymon Goldberg (vn, va 4 , cond 1–7,19,22,23 ); Netherlands CO; 1–7,19,22,23 Artur Balsam (pn); 7–11 Dimitri Mitropoulos, cond; 12 NYP-SO; 12 Zara Nelsova (vc); 17 Gerhard Read more Samuel, cond; 17 Oakland S; 17 Eduard van Beinum, cond; 18 Concertgebouw O; 18 William Steinberg, cond; 20 Pittsburgh SO; 20 Pablo Casals (vc); 13–15 Rudolf Serkin (pn); 13,14 Victor Babin (pn); 21 Mieczyslaw Horszowski (pn); 15,16 Elisabeth Schwartzkopf (sop); 23 Brooks Smith (pn); 24 Beveridge Webster (pn) 25,26 MUSIC & ARTS 1223 (8 CDs: 572:03) Live: Aldeburg 6/12/1960; 1,4,5,6 Tokyo 4/28/1966; 7,22 New York 3/3/1951, 9–11 1/14/1950; 12 Oakland 12/5-7/1967; 17 Edinburgh 9/4/1957; 18 Pittsburgh 11/28/1952; 20 Prades 6/18/1954, 13,14 6/14/1954; 15,16 Washington, D. C. 2/11/1966; 21 Sheveningen 6/25/1958; 23 London 1970; 27,28 Aspen 8/11/1965, 29 7/28/1968, 24 7/20/1966 25,26


BACH Violin Concertos: No. 1; 1 No. 2. 2 Brandenburg Concertos: No. 5; 3 No. 6. 4 Concerto in d for Violin and Oboe. 5 Cantata No. 21: Sinfonia. 6 Solo Violin Sonata No. 1. 27 Solo Violin Partita No. 2. 28 SCHUBERT Adagio and Rondo in A. 7 SCHUMANN Violin Sonata No. 1. 8 DEBUSSY Violin Sonata. 9 DVO?ÁK 4 Romantic Pieces. 10 GLUCK (arr. Kreisler) Orfeo ed Euridice: Melodie. 11 BEETHOVEN Violin Concerto. 12 Variations on “Ich bin der Schneider Kakadu.” 13 Piano Trios: in E?, op. 70/2; 14 in D, “Geister.” 15 Violin Sonata, op. 30/1. 16 BRAHMS Violin and Cello Concerto. 17 MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto. 18 MOZART Violin Concerto No. 4. 19 BERG Violin Concerto. 20 BABIN Konzerstück. 21 HAYDN Violin Concerto in C. 22 Non parti bell’idol mio-Berenice, che fai? 23 BARTÓK Solo Violin Sonata. 29 STRAVINSKY Duo concertante. 24 WEBERN 4 Pieces. 25 SCHOENBERG Fantasy 26


Szymon Goldberg, a student of Carl Flesch (after studying with Mieczyslaw Michalowicz), worked as concertmaster in Dresden and Berlin before being ousted by the Nazis from the latter position. He initiated a chamber-music and solo career after the war, and ended up teaching at Yale, Juilliard, and Curtis. He’s always been regarded as a fastidious musician, playing on a somewhat small scale (to match his ego, perhaps), yet a reliable soloist nonetheless. Music & Arts’ Frederick Maroth, according to his note, has been working on this collection of Goldberg’s non-commercial recordings for years, having corresponded with the violinist himself for a time, then finally negotiating with his widow for the rights that allowed him to proceed. The booklet includes an appreciative essay by Tully Potter, a note by Maroth, and a discography by Shuichiro Kawai that includes talks and master classes. Goldberg aficionados should be ecstatic.


Disc 1 includes performances of Bach’s violin concertos and Brandenburg Concertos Nos. 5 and 6 from the Aldeburgh Festival (the date and place of the Second Violin Concerto and Fifth Brandenburg aren’t specified). The two violin concertos, with buoyant orchestral support, showcase the Goldberg described above: his relationship to the orchestra, which he conducted with violin in hand, always remains within the bounds of chamber-like partnership. That may be due partly to the recorded sound, which doesn’t focus on him; but it may also be due to his musical personality and his sense that Bach’s concertos have little in common with Paganini’s. Nevertheless, he makes the passagework dance in the first movement of the Second Concerto, bariolage that often sounds square and mechanical. In its combination of chamber sensibility with rhythmic vigor, the musicianship he epitomized foreshadowed the period-instrument manner. His playing in the slow movements, too, sounds mesmerizing and hardly stylized—the melodies in the solo part unfold simply and naturally, with neither rigid adherence to tempo on the one hand nor soloistic liberties on the other. After the vigorous tutti in the Fifth Brandenburg Concerto , the more restricted sound of Adrian Bonsel’s flute and Goldberg’s violin may come as something of a surprise (as may the use of piano in the Fifth ); but, once again, the buoyancy of the playing in the first movement’s solo sections subordinates everything, including the piano, to the vigor of the musicianship, even if some listeners may feel that the soloists lose their way in the Affetuoso, and even if the finale doesn’t duplicate the first movement’s joie de vivre . Goldberg conducted, but this time also played the viola in the Sixth Brandenburg Concerto . The largely canonic first movement sounds almost homophonic, except for protruding solos, due either to the recorded sound or to the generally smooth homogeneity of the playing—and perhaps to both. While a few patches of questionable intonation may mar the second, the élan of the third sweeps away those memories.


Disc 2 includes two more performances of works by Bach, beginning with the Concerto for Oboe and Violin, with oboist Haakon Stotijn—again from the Aldeburgh Festival. In this performance, the soloists and orchestra appear to share a common enthusiasm, exemplified not only in the fast movements but by their rapt communication in the slow one as well. The insightful way Goldberg had with the same orchestra in Bach’s Sinfonia to the Cantata, BWV 21 (again with Stotijn as soloist), should come as no surprise, since Goldberg had conducted all the preceding performances in the collection. Schubert’s Adagio and Rondo in A Major with the same orchestra, from a performance in Tokyo, presents Goldberg in a very different kind of composition, in a solo part no longer as modest as those in Bach’s. Goldberg plays the Adagio mellifluously, allowing the runs to flash and flow instead of pushing them, and pertly in the Rondo, while building to a sparkling conclusion. The performance of Schumann’s First Violin Sonata with Artur Balsam, recorded in the studio by Decca in New York on June 1, 1953, and issued as Decca DL 9721 (included in the set, according to the notes, at the request of Goldberg’s widow), may not exude as much passionate energy in the first movement as does the performance of a more aggressive violinist like Semyon Sinkovsky (Melodiya 1169), but it’s warmly expressive. In the second movement, however, he and Balsam play with correspondingly greater geniality—and authority—in the contrasting sections, while the finale’s first theme also sounds correspondingly brighter and the chordal cadences don’t interrupt the flow as bumptiously. In Debussy’s Sonata, from 1951—also with Balsam, it seems clear to Potter that some “French violinist” helped Goldberg find his way. Yet the Sonata’s chamber character and Goldberg’s care not to assert his individuality in preference to a composer’s make it likely that Goldberg, who certainly must have heard performances of the Sonata, could have achieved this stylistic authenticity on his own—did the exceptional expressivity in the last movement really come from anyone else? In this performance, for the first time heretofore in the set, the grainy recorded sound robs listening of a great deal of its pleasure. The ethnically tinged (though perhaps not colored) performances of Dvo?ák’s Four Romantic Pieces come from the same session—as does that of Kreisler’s arrangement of Gluck’s “Melodie.”


Disc 3 includes two examples of the German concerto repertoire. In Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, from New York with Mitropoulos in 1950, Goldberg made use of an Urtext . With the support of the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra and Mitropoulos, Goldberg gave a probing performance (if, on specific occasions, a somewhat surprising one as well, due to the edition’s relative unfamiliarity) of the first movement that, in its conception at least, doesn’t sound at all small-scaled; its technically authoritative—even dazzling, manner, especially in the cadenza, may not often be associated with Goldberg. Goldberg’s simple way with the second movement demonstrates that profundity can be achieved classically, without recourse to bizarre timbral experiments such as those in which Anne-Sophie Mutter engaged in her reading with Kurt Masur and the New York Philharmonic (Deutsche Grammophon 471349, 26:5) or, with period instruments (compare Patricia Kopatchinskaja with Philippe Herreweghe and the Orchestre des Champs-Élysées, Naïve 5194). The finale sounds relaxed but still taut. Once again, as in the recordings from 1951 on the second disc, the recorded sound is grainy. The second performance, of Brahms’s Double Concerto with Zara Nelsova, comes from Oakland on December 5–7, 1967, and therefore enjoys somewhat more advanced recorded sound. If the orchestral part doesn’t storm majestically in the first movement, the soloists interact sensitively and bring it to a stirring conclusion. They play warmly in the second movement, though perhaps less obviously suggesting intimate dialogue between two developed individualities. Their richly Romantic reading of the finale alternates surging and bracing passages. All in all, it’s not a sharply characterized performance, nor one in glowing tone, like that of Francescatti and Fournier; still, it is workmanlike and communicative.


CD 4 continues with three more performances of standard—or near-standard—concertos. Goldberg is vibrantly assured and commanding in Mendelssohn’s Concerto with van Beinum and the Concertgebouw Orchestra—and the engineers captured him with a lively fidelity that does justice not only to his musical authority (and the Orchestra’s) but to his warm, silken tone. The first movement is full of small surprises—nuances in tempo and dynamics—that make this warhorse fresh and interesting. Goldberg’s hardly effusive reading of the slow movement also features highly individual touches that never sound in the least bit intrusive, while his spirited sprint through the finale showcases a polished technique that seldom so obviously takes center stage. Compared to Heifetz’s similarly masterly readings, Goldberg’s seems unforced, though, paradoxically, almost equally brilliant, especially in the blazing last page. Goldberg developed a reputation for his readings of Mozart, if for anything, and the composer’s Fourth Concerto represents him at perhaps his best. The legendary buoyancy and deftness of touch (qualities that Goldberg’s playing of Mozart shared with Grumiaux’s even more elegant manner) appear in the first movement—and the more-than-secure technical command shows itself in the cadenza. I’ve read a description of Goldberg’s playing of Mozart as “walking on eggs”; but that’s hardly appropriate for a performance as energetic as this one. Still, his piquancy in the Andante cantabile’s second theme makes it clear why this epithet ever came under consideration. In the finale, he makes light of across-the-string bowings that Ruggiero Ricci thought made this the most difficult of all concerto movements. As with Mendelssohn’s Concerto, the engineers revealed the vividness of Goldberg’s tone production, which contributes in no small measure to the liveliness of these two readings. Berg’s Concerto with Steinberg from 1952 allows listeners to hear Goldberg, for the first time in the set, in 20th-century literature. As in Bach’s concertos, Goldberg assumes an almost self-effacing chamber-like soloistic profile similar to André Gertler’s in his recording with Paul Kletzki on LP, Angel 35091 and reissued on CD as Hungaroton 31635 along with the original pairing of Bartók’s Solo Sonata and including as well Bach’s A-Minor Violin Concerto. But Goldberg is more incisive in the first-movement’s two sections, thereby imparting to them, paradoxically, a more sensitive wistfulness. In the final movement, based on Bach’s chorale, Es ist genug , Goldberg and Steinberg (who seems acutely aware of the passages’ timbral possibilities as well as their abundant polyphonic ones) move from brooding to ethereal triumph in a shatteringly quiet conclusion. This single performance alone would justify the purchase of the complete set.


Disc 5 contains the two performances that Goldberg himself had previously approved for release by Frederick Maroth: Beethoven’s Variations with Pablo Casals and Rudolf Serkin and Victor Babin’s Konzertstück (with Babin at the piano), in addition to a reading of Beethoven’s Trio, op. 70/2, with Casals and Serkin. It’s easy to see why Goldberg should have given such permission for the performance of the Variations from Prades in 1954—a penetrating, stylish, and rhythmically alert reading with no hint of tonal weakness (though neither Goldberg nor Casals seem willing to sacrifice sense to sound). The engineering seems almost extraordinary for its date. The Trio, performed the same day, enjoyed the same propitious recorded sound. The interaction between the members of the ensemble, though perhaps not at such a consistently high level of intensity as in the Variations , nevertheless ensures the performance a communicative urgency that compensates for any suggestion of timbral ungainliness. Goldberg and Babin performed Babin’s Konzertstück at the Library of Congress in 1966, and it received the benefit of more advanced recorded sound. It is couched in an advanced harmonic idiom that’s still essentially tonal; and it requires brilliant, razor-sharp articulation in off-the-string bowings to meet its considerable technical demands. Goldberg proves himself amply in command of these skills, and, together with the composer, he gives a bracing performance.


Disc 6’s opening work, Beethoven’s “Ghost” Trio—again with Casals, but this time with pianist Mieczyslaw Horszowski—also comes from the Prades Festival, four days before the performances on disc 5. This reading features an explosive opening and subsequent passagework in the first movement, with Horszowski serving as a fluent, congenial, and, when necessary, tempestuous partner (who can rumble ominously) for the two string players, who alternate impetuosity and sensitivity. The drama heightens in the second movement. Goldberg imitates one of Casals’s noisy expressive portamentos just before the climax—but, to be sure, not every interaction sounds remotely mechanical. The finale is robust. The recorded sound, not at the same level of fidelity as in the two performances of roughly the same vintage on disc 5, includes lots of extraneous noise, perhaps from tape deterioration and even perhaps from some audible groaning. Potter identifies Haydn’s C-Major Concerto as one of Goldberg’s favorites—he recorded it for Decca with Susskind and the Philharmonia Orchestra on April 19, 1947, and with the Netherlands Chamber Orchestra on October 27–31, 1974, for Philips. The live performance from April 28, 1966, in Tokyo received a sort of tubby recording with a murky, booming bass that makes the entire performance sound bottom heavy; but it doesn’t seem due entirely to the recorded sound that Goldberg appears less fleet, lacking even Stern’s ruddy strength, in the first movement and less straightforwardly songful (the cantabile sounds forced almost throughout), than he does in Mozart’s Concerto No. 4 or Mendelssohn’s Concerto from disc 4. The program concludes with Goldberg conducting Haydn’s Hob XXIVa:10, Non parti bell’idol mio—Berenice, che fai? on June 25, 1968, with Elisabeth Schwarzkopf and the Netherlands Chamber Orchestra in Sheveningen at the Holland Festival.


Disc 7 presents Goldberg in paradigmatic German repertoire: Bach’s sonatas and partitas and Beethoven’s violin sonatas, the former two from a BBC Studio concert in 1970 and the latter from June 14, 1954, at the Prades Festival, with Horszowski at the piano (the same day as the “Ghost” Trio). In the opening Adagio of Bach’s First Sonata, Goldberg plays the chords lightly and fleetingly, quickly leaving the melodic note that continues the melody sounding alone. Despite this emphasis on the melodic line, however, the reading sounds severe and unyielding, like a holy text declaimed ritually in an aggressively punchy monotone. If Ricci has a reputation as slash-and-hack-Meister, Goldberg’s manner in the Fuga might qualify him for the same distinction. The Siciliana returns to the declamatory manner of the Adagio. Nathan Milstein, especially in his second set, integrated years of experience of the works into a highly personal, yet loftily elevated, view. His first set, on the other hand, served as a dazzling display of virtuosic elegance. Violinists who take a more academic view of the sonatas and partitas, on the other hand, often churn out comparatively joyless exercises that strain at monumentality. Regrettably, the Goldberg who danced intoxicated in Mozart restrained himself in Bach (and, after all, Bach, not Mozart, fathered all those children). Speaking of dancing, the Second Partita consists entirely of dances, though stylized ones. Period instrumentalists perhaps begin with dance rhythms and move on; we’ve heard in recent years many performances (such as Janine Jansen’s of the Second Partita, Decca 000990502, 31:4) that pay tribute to that movement and to the dances themselves. But Goldberg’s dances, except, perhaps, for his winged reading of the Gigue, seem to be conceived for cloggers in lead boots. The Chaconne, though with a moderate timing of 14:57, sounds tonally forced, too—in strong opposition to simply allowing the sound to arise from the instrument. The timing might be a bit misleading, because the tempo’s hardly unvarying. Ida Haendel once remarked in an interview that you should be able to hear Bach’s steady heartbeat throughout the Chaconne. There’s another strongly contrasting view (apparently to Goldberg’s), not unrelated to the idea of a dance’s steady rhythmic pulse. The roughly 62-year-old’s tone seemed least genial in these two performances as well, and the recorded sound is faithful enough to represent it fairly. There will certainly be listeners who deem this kind of interpretation not only acceptable but normative; however, others, who seek either warmer personalization, sharper wit, greater lift, or greater lilt, should beware. (Incidentally, there’s a great deal of roughness—and some inaccuracy—in Goldberg’s bowing throughout but especially in the Chaconne, suggesting perhaps debility, either incipient or transitory, that might mitigate the harshness of this judgment.) Goldberg didn’t play Beethoven’s Sixth Sonata (or any of the other works by that German composer in this collection) with the same sense of monumentality he did Bach’s Solo sonatas and partitas, and it may come as relief to many listeners to return to Goldberg’s unforced, natural style.


Disc 8 brings the collection to a close with performances of 20th-century works from the Aspen Festival during the 1960s: Bartók’s Solo Sonata from 1965, Stravinsky’s Duo concertante with Brooks Smith from 1968, Webern’s Four Pieces and Schoenberg’s Fantasy with Beveridge Webster on the same day, July 20, 1966. Tully Potter suggests that Goldberg didn’t spice Bartók’s Solo Sonata with enough paprika, but many violinists don’t, and from the outset of the Ciaccona, it’s clear that Goldberg brings an acute rhythmic sensibility, clarity of melodic line, and sharpness of articulation that help him make a strong case, ethnic or not, for that movement. If he seems to lose direction for a time in the Fuga, he regains it by the end. A similar sense of wandering besets the Melodia. Potter mentions Goldberg’s Presto in particular as lacking in Hungarian exoticism, but the second, ethnic, theme makes its point in its own way. The recorded sound includes noise that sounds like outside traffic as well as some other defects that might be due simply to the medium. Anyway, some violinists play the Sonata as though it had been conceived as a swashbuckling barnburner, Gypsy or not, and some as though it simply presented so many puzzles to be solved and rewards would flow from finding satisfactory—and satisfying—answers; somewhat in the manner of Christian Tetzlaff (Virgin 45668, 28:2) Goldberg falls near the center of the spectrum. The engineers served Goldberg and Smith well, however, in Stravinsky’s Duo concertante , and they turned in a rhythmically vibrant account, especially in the Eclogue I. In 28:5, I suggested that Leonidas Kavakos and Péter Nagy (ECM 1855) played the Duo with “spiky relish” and probed “deeper, quasi-mythic levels of musical suggestiveness as well,” extracting “bracing effects even in passages of greatest textural asperity.” Joseph Szigeti, with Stravinsky himself at the piano, may not reach Kavakos’s crackling static electricty; yet its “greater overall dryness” provides an alternative bearing the composer’s signature. Goldberg and Webster, equally well recorded, play Webern’s Four Pieces with sensitivity to the individuality of the pulverized gestures that compose them; they wring from them a comprehensible musical message. In Schoenberg’s Fantasy, they isolate easily followed threads within the complex structure (Goldberg’s occasional portamentos even lend it a rather old-fashioned feel, which, for some listeners, may be the spoonful of sugar that makes the dissonances go down and for others may simply seem anomalous).


The set’s comprehensive notes and wealth of supporting material make the release an embarrassment of riches. Given the opportunities this collection presents to hear Szymon Goldberg in repertoire he didn’t record in the studio, and given the importance of the repertoire he championed, Music & Arts’ set should be have an honored place in serious collections of all kinds.


FANFARE: Robert Maxham
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Works on This Recording

1.
Rondo for Violin and Strings in A major, D 438 by Franz Schubert
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1816; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/28/1966 
Venue:  Hibiya Public Hall, Tokyo 
Length: 12 Minutes 40 Secs. 
2.
Sonata for Violin and Piano no 1 in A minor, Op. 105 by Robert Schumann
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Artur Balsam (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1851; Germany 
Date of Recording: 06/01/1953 
Venue:  New York, NY 
Length: 17 Minutes 30 Secs. 
3.
Sonata for Violin and Piano in G minor by Claude Debussy
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Artur Balsam (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1916-1917; France 
Date of Recording: 03/03/1951 
Venue:  New York, NY 
Length: 12 Minutes 26 Secs. 
4.
Romantic Pieces (4) for Violin and Piano, Op. 75/B 150 by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Artur Balsam (Piano), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1887; Bohemia 
Date of Recording: 03/03/1951 
Venue:  New York, NY 
Length: 9 Minutes 40 Secs. 
5.
Melody in the Style of Gluck by Fritz Kreisler
Performer:  Artur Balsam (Piano), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 03/03/1951 
Venue:  New York, NY 
Length: 3 Minutes 31 Secs. 
6.
Concerto for Violin and Cello in A minor, Op. 102 "Double" by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Zara Nelsova (Cello), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Gerhard Samuel
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1887; Austria 
Venue:  Civic Auditorium Oakland 
Length: 31 Minutes 30 Secs. 
7.
Concerto for Violin in E minor, Op. 64 by Felix Mendelssohn
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Eduard Van Beinum
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1844; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/04/1957 
Venue:  Usher Hall, Edinburgh, Scotland 
Length: 26 Minutes 5 Secs. 
8.
Concert Piece, for violin & piano by Victor Babin
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Victor Babin (Piano)
Date of Recording: 02/11/1966 
Venue:  Library of Congress, Washington D.C. 
Length: 20 Minutes 3 Secs. 
9.
Concerto for Violin no 1 in C major, H 7a no 1 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1769; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 04/28/1966 
Venue:  Hibiya Public Hall, Tokyo 
Length: 20 Minutes 5 Secs. 
10.
Berenice, che fai, H 24a no 10 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Elisabeth Schwarzkopf ()
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795; London, England 
Date of Recording: 06/25/1958 
Venue:  Kurzaal, Scheveningen, Holland Festival 
Length: 11 Minutes 30 Secs. 
11.
Duo concertant for Violin and Piano by Igor Stravinsky
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Brooks Smith (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1931-1932; France 
Date of Recording: 07/28/1968 
Venue:  Aspen Festival 
Length: 15 Minutes 24 Secs. 
12.
Fantasy for Violin and Piano, Op. 47 by Arnold Schoenberg
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Beveridge Webster (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1949; USA 
Length: 8 Minutes 59 Secs. 
13.
Sonata for Violin solo, Sz 117 by Béla Bartók
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1944; USA 
Date of Recording: 08/11/1965 
Venue:  Aspen Festival 
Length: 26 Minutes 43 Secs. 
14.
Concerto for Violin no 1 in A minor, BWV 1041 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Janny Van Wering (Harpsichord)
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1723; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 06/12/1960 
Venue:  Framlingham Church, Aldeburgh Festival, 
Length: 15 Minutes 46 Secs. 
15.
Concerto for Violin no 2 in E major, BWV 1042 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1723; Cöthen, Germany 
Length: 19 Minutes 2 Secs. 
16.
Brandenburg Concerto no 5 in D major, BWV 1050 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Adriaan Bonsel (Flute), Maria Curcio (Piano), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720-1721; ?Cöthen, Germany 
Length: 22 Minutes 32 Secs. 
17.
Brandenburg Concerto no 6 in B flat major, BWV 1051 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Viola), Janny Van Wering (Harpsichord)
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1708-1710; ?Weimar, Germany 
Date of Recording: 06/12/1960 
Venue:  Framlingham Church, Aldeburgh Festival, 
Length: 18 Minutes 7 Secs. 
18.
Concerto for Oboe and Violin in C minor, BWV 1060 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Haakon Stotijn (Oboe), Janny Van Wering (Harpsichord), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Baroque 
Date of Recording: 06/12/1960 
Venue:  Framlingham Church, Aldeburgh Festival, 
Length: 15 Minutes 4 Secs. 
19.
Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis, BWV 21: no 1, Sinfonia in C minor by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Janny Van Wering (Harpsichord), Haakon Stotijn (Oboe)
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1714; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 06/12/1960 
Venue:  Framlingham Church, Aldeburgh Festival, 
Length: 3 Minutes 24 Secs. 
20.
Concerto for Violin in D major, Op. 61 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Dimitri Mitropoulos
Period: Classical 
Written: 1806; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 01/14/1950 
Venue:  Carnegie Hall, NY 
Length: 44 Minutes 22 Secs. 
21.
Concerto for Violin no 4 in D major, K 218 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Szymon Goldberg
Period: Classical 
Written: 1775 
Length: 24 Minutes 37 Secs. 
22.
Concerto for Violin by Alban Berg
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  William Steinberg
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1935; Austria 
Date of Recording: 11/28/1952 
Venue:  Syria Mosque, Pittsburgh 
Length: 26 Minutes 18 Secs. 
23.
Trio for Piano and Strings no 11 in G major, Op. 121a "Kakadu Variations" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Pablo Casals (Cello), Rudolf Serkin (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1803/1816; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 06/18/1954 
Venue:  Prades 
Length: 6 Minutes 58 Secs. 
24.
Trio for Piano and Strings no 6 in E flat major, Op. 70 no 2 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Pablo Casals (Cello), Rudolf Serkin (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1808; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 06/18/1954 
Venue:  Prades 
Length: 34 Minutes 6 Secs. 
25.
Trio for Piano and Strings no 5 in D major, Op. 70 no 1 "Ghost" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Mieczyslaw Horszowski (Piano), Pablo Casals (Cello)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1808; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 06/14/1954 
Venue:  Prades 
Length: 30 Minutes 59 Secs. 
26.
Sonata for Violin solo no 1 in G minor, BWV 1001 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1970 
Venue:  BBC Studios, Maida Vale, London, England 
Length: 17 Minutes 38 Secs. 
27.
Partita for Violin solo no 2 in D minor, BWV 1004 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1970 
Venue:  BBC Studios, Maida Vale, London, England 
Length: 25 Minutes 16 Secs. 
28.
Sonata for Violin and Piano no 6 in A major, Op. 30 no 1 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Mieczyslaw Horszowski (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1801-1802; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 06/14/1954 
Venue:  Prades 
Length: 24 Minutes 11 Secs. 
29.
Pieces (4) for Violin and Piano, Op. 7 by Anton Webern
Performer:  Beveridge Webster (Piano), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1910/1914; Preglhof 
Date of Recording: 07/20/1966 
Venue:  Aspen Festival 
Length: 5 Minutes 16 Secs. 

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