WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Romantic Music For Wind Instruments / Siegmann, Swiss Co


Release Date: 12/12/1995 
Label:  Claves   Catalog #: 9409   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Emil HartmannWilhelm BergerRichard Strauss
Performer:  Diane DohertyDaniel SchneiderBarbara BoppartMarkus Boppart,   ... 
Conductor:  Christian Siegmann
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Swiss Chamber Orchestra
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 1 Hours 9 Mins. 

In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  
On sale! $19.98
CD:  $16.99
In Stock



Notes and Editorial Reviews

The use of court wind bands for entertainment of various and sundry kinds in the 18th and early 19th centuries has been well documented and neither needs nor requires elucidation here. But even though the death knell had sounded for the time-honored tradition by the era of Romanticism, and string instruments had replaced the winds as preferred soloists in concertos and chamber music, numerous composers still maintained an interest in the tradition of Harmonie and isolated works continued to appear for variations on the basic instrumentation of pairs of oboes, clarinets, bassoons, and horns. These include the Serenade, op. 44 of Dvo?ák, the Suite, op. 4, and Serenade, op. 7, of Richard Strauss, Charles Gounod’s Petite symphonie, and Read more Louis Gouvy’s Petite suite gauloise.

Two of the works on this Claves CD, originally issued in 1994, should be added to that list: Emil Hartmann’s Serenade, op. 43, and Wilhelm Berger’s Serenade in F, op. 102. The Strauss work recorded here is familiar enough to not entail commentary, save to say that it stems from his youth and was inspired to a greater or lesser degree by Mozart’s Serenade in B flat, K. 361.

Neither the names of Hartmann or Berger should strike a familiar chord with the larger musical public, but aficionados of Danish music may instantly recognize Emil Hartmann (1836–1898) as belonging to Denmark’s first family of musicians, specifically, the son of Johann Peter Emilius Hartmann, called “The Father of the Danish Symphony” and who also was the father-in-law of another “Great Dane,” Niels Gade. In this work by the younger Hartmann, it is readily apparent that the apple didn’t fall far from the tree. Hartmann altered the makeup of the basic wind octet, dispensing with one of the oboes and adding a flute, but retained the traditional cello and double bass to strengthen the bottom end; he also reversed the positions of the slow movement and scherzo. The music is Mendelssohnian in tone and decidedly derivative, but what music isn’t? The trick is to keep it from spiraling into a maelstrom of mediocrity, and that’s accomplished here by expertly juxtaposing dramatic intensity with pastoral serenity.

The Serenade in F, op. 102 of Wilhelm Berger (1861–1911), numbers among his final works. Again, there is a different take on the makeup of the band: Berger augmented the basic wind octet with a brace of flutes and eliminated the traditional foundation of a cello and/or double bass. He also broadens the scope of the piece by including not only a minuet but also a scherzo. While the disposition of Berger’s serenade is decidedly sunny, it is not without its darker moments. A melancholic aura surrounds the Adagio, lending the work a new and more serious tone before it is swept under the rug by the cheerful optimism of the concluding Rondo.

Christian Siegemann and Banda Classica owned the turf of Hartmann and Berger at the time of this CD’s original release and still do. No challenges to this dominance have arisen and none are likely to. Overflowing with lyricism, crackling with energy, and underwritten by conviction, these are passionate and sympathetic accounts that bring belated credit to the music and its composers. Everything is presented in an unaffected manner, resulting in performances that speak to both the ear and soul of the auditor.

Michael Carter, FANFARE
Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Serenade for Winds in B flat major, Op. 43 by Emil Hartmann
Performer:  Diane Doherty (Oboe), Daniel Schneider (Clarinet), Barbara Boppart (Clarinet),
Markus Boppart (Bassoon), Jürgen Obrecht (Bassoon), Lorenz Raths (French Horn),
John Havu (French Horn), Günther Geiser (Double Bass), Jürg Eichenberger (Cello),
Sylvie Dambrine (Flute)
Conductor:  Christian Siegmann
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Swiss Chamber Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Date of Recording: 02/1994 
Venue:  Radio Studio Zürich, Switzerland 
Length: 19 Minutes 56 Secs. 
2.
Serenade for Winds in F major, Op. 102 by Wilhelm Berger
Performer:  Sylvie Dambrine (Flute), Susanne Forster (Flute), Diane Doherty (Oboe),
Alexander Oguey (Oboe), Daniel Schneider (Clarinet), Barbara Boppart (Clarinet),
Markus Boppart (Bassoon), Jürgen Obrecht (Bassoon), Lorenz Raths (French Horn),
John Havu (French Horn), Joseph Koller (French Horn), Marco Müller (French Horn)
Conductor:  Christian Siegmann
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Swiss Chamber Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/1994 
Venue:  Radio Studio Zürich, Switzerland 
Length: 24 Minutes 18 Secs. 
3.
Suite for 13 Winds in B flat major, Op. 4 by Richard Strauss
Performer:  Susanne Forster (Flute), Diane Doherty (Oboe), Barbara Boppart (Clarinet),
Markus Boppart (Bassoon), Jürgen Obrecht (Bassoon), Lorenz Raths (French Horn),
John Havu (French Horn), Joseph Koller (French Horn), Marco Müller (French Horn),
Sylvie Dambrine (Flute), Daniel Schneider (Clarinet), Alexander Oguey (Oboe),
Günther Geiser (Double Bass)
Conductor:  Christian Siegmann
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Swiss Chamber Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1884; Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/1994 
Venue:  Radio Studio Zürich, Switzerland 
Length: 24 Minutes 23 Secs. 

Customer Reviews

Be the first to review this title
Review This Title
Review This Title Share on Facebook




YOU MUST BE A SUBSCRIBER TO LISTEN TO ARKIVMUSIC STREAMING.
TRY IT NOW FOR FREE!
Sign up now for two weeks of free access to the world's best classical music collection. Keep listening for only $19.95/month - thousands of classical albums for the price of one! Learn more about ArkivMusic Streaming
Aleady a subscriber? Sign In