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Mozart In Italien

Mozart / Hasse / Lamotte / Contzen / Bcp / Goebel
Release Date: 10/26/2010 
Label:  Oehms   Catalog #: 753   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Johann Adolf HasseThomas Linley (The YoungeVenanzio RauzziniFranz Lamotte,   ... 
Performer:  Mirijam Contzen
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bavarian Chamber Philharmonic
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 0 Hours 59 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews



MOZART IN ITALY Mirijam Contzen (vn); Reinhard Goebel, cond; Bavarian CP OEHMS 753 (59:12)


HASSE Ruggiero: Sinfonia. LINLEY Violin Concerto in F. RAUZZINI Sinfonia in D. LAMOTTE Violin Concerto No. 2 in D. MOZART Read more class="ARIAL12b"> Sinfonia in D, K 111/120


The program of Mirijam Contzen’s and Reinhard Goebel’s CD Mozart in Italy consists of pieces associated with Mozart during the years he spent in that country. The notes by Karl Boehmer trace the connections of each of these works to Mozart: Hasse’s opera Ruggiero, for example, would appear, as would Mozart’s Sinfonia, K 111, as a serenata (Mozart added a non-choral third movement later—K 120), on the occasion of the wedding of Archduke Ferdinand. The young English prodigy Thomas Linley Jr. met and played with Mozart in 1771. Mozart heard and wrote his Exultate jubilate for Venanzio Rauzzini, a castrato. And the violinist Franz Lamotte had to wait, as did Mozart, for an audience with the King and Queen of Naples. These personalities and their music provide a context that fleshes out the bare bones of Mozart’s schedule in Italy.


Whether or not Mozart stole the show from Hasse when their two works appeared, the brief sinfonia from Ruggiero begins with auspicious strokes that Goebel has enshrined in a commanding rush of sound. He and the orchestra play the slow movement with a piquant charm that provides a respite from the timpani strokes that return in the finale.


Thomas Linley’s violin concerto appeared in a collection of English concertos performed by Elizabeth Wallfisch on period instruments with the Parley of Instruments on Hyperion CDA 66865, Fanfare 20:2 and 31:6. If Mirijam Contzen sounds unsure in two octave passages (one at the beginning of the first movement, and one at the end), she certainly sprinkles handfuls of stardust over the sparkling passages in the upper registers. The work begins with an imposing tutti, and long tutti stretches interrupt the solo from time to time; a brief and not particularly showy cadenza brings the movement to a close. The short (2:28) and song-like Adagio provides an engaging transition to the finale, a Rondeau that combines, in this performance, elegance and charm with somewhat tame technical demands, in a manner reminiscent of the violinistic, rhythmic, and melodic śuvre of Giuseppe Tartini (Linley studied with Tartini’s famous pupil Pietro Nardini), though Linley makes more consistent forays into the higher positions. Contzen’s a sweeter-toned soloist than Wallfisch, and those who admire Wallfisch’s artistry without warming to her “period” sound may find that Contzen’s recording provides more ingratiating entree into this at worst pleasant concerto.


Rauzzini’s sinfonia, like Hasse’s, begins sonorously, but it continues with an alternation of bombast and delicacy, though predominantly in a strongly dramatic vein—a manner that Goebels and the orchestra capture so successfully in the work that begins the program. Once again, too, the Andante serves only as a sort of intermezzo between the more commanding outer movements, the last one in this case a sort of barnburner in which the orchestra plays with obvious relish.


Franz Lamotte’s Violin Concerto No. 2 (of four), at almost 20 minutes the longest composition on the program, begins with an extended orchestral introduction. The violin part displays the warmth of Contzen’s tone in the lower registers as well as her athleticism in the highest ones, into which the solo soars, but not so consistently as it does in Linley’s work (most, though by no means all, of its passagework remains in the middle registers). Once again, the passagework sounds similar to that in Giovanni Battista Viotti’s works (despite his connection to Nardini, so does Linley’s). The slow movement might have come from one of Mozart’s concertos, and the Rondeau, like its counterpart in Linley’s concerto, seems more notable for the elegance of its gestures than for any virtuoso flair.


There only remains the last piece on the program, Mozart’s sinfonia, originally for Ascanio in Alba . Anyone who wonders why this didn’t appear after Hasse’s work will understand when listening: The difference in quality between this and all the other works on the program makes it clear why Mozart’s father gloated (as related in the notes) that his son’s work had crushed Hasse’s opera.


Contzen, Goebels, and the orchestra recorded the program in Studio 1 of the Bavarian Radio on February 25–28, 2010; the engineers balanced the soloist and orchestra in what many would consider a natural way, with the violin arising from the (detailed) orchestral sound rather than posturing in front of it. Recommended for the orchestra’s tangy, exuberant performances as well as for the well-selected program, to listeners of all kinds.


FANFARE: Robert Maxham
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Works on This Recording

1.
Ruggerio: Sinfonia: Maestoso, e staccato by Johann Adolf Hasse
Performer:  Mirijam Contzen (Violin)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bavarian Chamber Philharmonic
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1771 
Venue:  Studio 1 Des Bayerischen Rundfunks 
Length: 3 Minutes 23 Secs. 
2.
Ruggerio: Sinfonia: Andantino by Johann Adolf Hasse
Performer:  Mirijam Contzen (Violin)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bavarian Chamber Philharmonic
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1771 
Venue:  Studio 1 Des Bayerischen Rundfunks 
Length: 1 Minutes 43 Secs. 
3.
Ruggerio: Sinfonia: Allegro con spirito by Johann Adolf Hasse
Performer:  Mirijam Contzen (Violin)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bavarian Chamber Philharmonic
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1771 
Venue:  Studio 1 Des Bayerischen Rundfunks 
Length: 1 Minutes 25 Secs. 
4.
Concerto for violin & orchestra in F by Thomas Linley (The Younge
Performer:  Mirijam Contzen (Violin)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bavarian Chamber Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Venue:  Studio 1 Des Bayerischen Rundfunks 
Length: 18 Minutes 11 Secs. 
5.
Sinfonia for orchestra in D major by Venanzio Rauzzini
Performer:  Mirijam Contzen (Violin)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bavarian Chamber Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Venue:  Studio 1 Des Bayerischen Rundfunks 
Length: 8 Minutes 32 Secs. 
6.
Violin Concerto No. 2 in D major by Franz Lamotte
Performer:  Mirijam Contzen (Violin)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bavarian Chamber Philharmonic
Period: Classical 
Venue:  Studio 1 Des Bayerischen Rundfunks 
Length: 19 Minutes 38 Secs. 
7.
Ascanio in Alba, K 111: Sinfonia in D major by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Mirijam Contzen (Violin)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bavarian Chamber Philharmonic

Sound Samples

Il Ruggiero: Sinfonia: I. Mestoso e staccato
Il Ruggiero: Sinfonia: II. Andantino
Il Ruggiero: Sinfonia: III. Allegro con spirito
Violin Concerto in F major: I. Moderato
Violin Concerto in F major: II. Adagio
Violin Concerto in F major: III. Rondeau
Symphony in D major: I. Allegro
Symphony in D major: II. Andante
Symphony in D major: III. Allegro
Violin Concerto No. 2 in D major: I. Moderato
Violin Concerto No. 2 in D major: II. Andante
Violin Concerto No. 2 in D major: III. Rondeau
Symphony in D major, K. 120: I. Allegro assai
Symphony in D major, K. 120: II. Andante grazioso
Symphony in D major, K. 120: III. Finale: Presto

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