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Il violoncello del cardinale / Ceccato, Accademia Ottoboni


Release Date: 08/25/2017 
Label:  Alpha Productions   Catalog #: 368  
Composer:  Pietro Gaetano BoniFilippo AmadeiNicola Francesco HaymGiuseppe Maria Perroni,   ... 
Performer:  Marco CeccatoAnna FontanaFrancesco RomanoRebeca Ferri
Number of Discs: 1 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

Cardinals Benedetto Pamphili and Pietro Ottoboni played a prominent role in Rome at the turn of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries with their patronage of the three most important composers of the day, Corelli, Alessandro Scarlatti and Handel. At that time, numerous musicians converged on Rome, and the large orchestra directed by Arcangelo Corelli at the church of San Luigi dei Francesci included several famous cellists, among them G.L., Lular, N.F. Haym, F. Amadei and G.M. Perroni. As well as notable virtuosos, these men were often also composers of oratorios, vocal music, and pieces for their own favorite instrument, though very few of those have survived. It is to their music, often unpublished, that Marco Ceccato and his Read more Accademia, winners of a Diapason d'Or of the year in 2015, introduce us here, along with works by the composers who subsequently formed the core of this group after Handel left for London: Bononcini, Boni, and Costanzi, who was later to teach Boccherini. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Sonatas (12) for Cello and Harpsichord, Op. 1: no 8 in F Major by Pietro Gaetano Boni
Performer:  Marco Ceccato (Cello), Anna Fontana (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: France 
2.
Sonata for Cello in D Minor, WD 896/10 by Filippo Amadei
Performer:  Marco Ceccato (Cello), Anna Fontana (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: Italy 
3.
Sonata for Cello No. 1 in A Minor/E Minor by Nicola Francesco Haym
Performer:  Marco Ceccato (Cello), Anna Fontana (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: Italy 
4.
Sonata for Cello No. 2 in D Major by Giuseppe Maria Perroni
Performer:  Marco Ceccato (Cello), Anna Fontana (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: Italy 
5.
Sonatas (12) for Cello and Harpsichord, Op. 1: no 9 in G Minor by Pietro Gaetano Boni
Performer:  Marco Ceccato (Cello), Anna Fontana (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: France 
6.
Sinfonia for Cello & Basso Continuo in D Major by Giovanni Battista Costanzi
Performer:  Anna Fontana (Harpsichord), Marco Ceccato (Cello), Francesco Romano (Theorbo)
Period: Baroque 
Written: Italy 
7.
Sonata for Cello No. 1 in A Major by Giuseppe Maria Perroni
Performer:  Marco Ceccato (Cello), Anna Fontana (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: Italy 
8.
Sonata for Cello and Basso Continuo by Giovanni Bononcini
Performer:  Anna Fontana (Harpsichord), Marco Ceccato (Cello), Rebeca Ferri (Cello)
Period: Baroque 
Written: Italy 
9.
Amor di che tu vuoi by Giovanni L. Lulier
Performer:  Anna Fontana (Harpsichord), Marco Ceccato (Cello), Rebeca Ferri (Cello)
Period: Baroque 
Written: Italy 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 Another fine Alpha reissue November 6, 2017 By Ralph Graves (Hood, VA) See All My Reviews "From the 1680s through the 1710s, Rome was one of the major music centers of Europe. Corelli, Handel, and Scarlatti were all active in the city. Their presence, in turn, attracted the best musicians to the Eternal City. Cardinals Benedetto Pamphill and Pietro Ottoboni were major patrons of this musical activity. Some of the finest cello virtuosi/composers were in their retinues. This release presents some of their music. Originally released in 2015, "The Cardinals Cellos" presents works by eight of these virtuosi, spanning 24 years. While they wrote music for their instrument, all eight composed oratorios, operas, concerto grossi, and other forms. Giovanni Lullier is the earliest, entering service in 1676. None of his cello works survive. He's represented by a transcribed aria "Amor di che tu viol." It's a charmingly simple work, with an appealing melody with regular phrasing. The last composer of the line is Giovanni Costanzi, active through 1778. His Sinfonia in D major represents a dramatic change over Lullier's work. And it anticipates the style of Luigi Boccherini, one of Costanzi's star pupils. Marco Ceccato plays with a nice, rounded tone that's somewhat unusual on a cello of the period. He performs with a very light touch and precise articulation -- particularly in the rapid passages. The Accademia Ottoboni have a clean ensemble sound that nicely showcases the solo cello. The close-mic'd recording gives these modest chamber works an appealing intimacy." Report Abuse
 More than just a mood elevator October 12, 2017 By Dean Frey See All My Reviews "In the 1950s & 60s there was a radio show from WNYC called "DeKoven Presents", which focussed on the music of the Baroque, or rather the pre-classical music that DeKoven called Barococo. I listened to DeKoven (it was always just DeKoven: "no sir or mister") in the late 60s and early 70s on CKUA, the great radio station at 580 kc. in Edmonton. The reason I'm reminiscing here is that while DeKoven was way ahead of the curve in appreciating early music, he did have an oddity, which Brendan Gill points out in his New Yorker profile from 1962: "He wants his programs to [be] anti-soporific so he plays only those parts of compositions that go very fast." I knew at the time this was a mis-step, and as early music has evolved over the decades I'm absolutely sure that the musical genius in this period comes from the entire range rather than just the peppy, and that it serves as much more than just a mood elevator. I was reminded of this when I listened to this disc of Cello Sonatas from the marvellous Marco Ceccato and his Accademia Ottoboni. There is so much dignity and gravity and serious thought in much of this music. This Grave movement from Giuseppe Maria Perroni's Cello Sonata no. 1 is a good example. So much of this music is like this, lots of it of the same high calibre. But lest you think there's only slow arrows in this bow, you can also find more spirited music. DeKoven himself would have enjoyed the tiny theatrical, folk-inspired Allegro assai by Nicola Haym. I wonder if he'd have rated it OTW (out of this world), OTG (out of this galaxy), or even the sublime OTC (out of this cosmos)?" Report Abuse
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