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The Music Of Charles Dickens And His Time / Seven Dials Band


Release Date: 03/27/2012 
Label:  Warner Classics   Catalog #: 661451   
Composer:  TraditionalJohn HullahEdward BradleyHenry Bishop,   ... 
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
Number of Discs: 1 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

Re-issued for this year of Dickens, The Music of Charles Dickens and his Time is a lively and entertaining collection of Victorian songs and tunes which are all associated with the life and work of Charles Dickens.

The 20 tracks include everything from genteel parlour ballads to cockney ditties such as The Ratcatcher's Daughter and Shiverand Shakery - the Man Who Couldn't Get Warm. Here too are Home, Sweet Home (with which Dickens, playing the accordion, regaled the ladies' cabin during his first voyage to the United States) and dance medleys - The Christmas Carol Quadrilles and the David Copperfield Polkas - brought out by enterprising 19th-century music publishers to cash in on Dickens's name.

Of special
Read more interest are several of Dickens's own songs which have never, to our knowledge, been recorded before. They include two charming pieces from The Village Coquettes, a comic operetta written by the young novelist in 1836. You will also find period settings of The Ivy Green and Mr Wardle's Carol from The Pickwick Papers; and a savagely satirical ballad, The Fine Old English Gentleman - New Version, which Dickens penned for The Examiner.

1. The College Hornpipe (1.27) A popular dance tune, perhaps 18th century in origin. Dickens refers to it both in Dombey and Son and in David Copperfield.

2. Some Folks Who Have Grown Old (2.50) A song from The Village Coquettes, a comic operetta written by the young Dickens, with music by John Pyke Hullah.

3. The Ratcatcher's Daughter (3.29) Dickens notices the sheet music for the Ratcatcher's Daughter in a music shop 'having every polka with a coloured frontispiece that ever was published’.

4. Home, Sweet Home (2.53) Dickens regaled the ladies' cabin with an accordion during his first voyage to the United States. 'You can't think with what feeling I play Home Sweet Home every night, or how pleasantly sad it makes us,'

5. Begone, Dull Care (1.49) A 17th-century glee still sung in Victorian times. Dickens makes reference to the song in several writings.

6. The Ivy Green (3.18) This piece, recited in The Pickwick Papers (Ch. 6) by the clergyman of Dingley Dell, proved to be Dickens's most popular song. The piano setting is by Henry Burnett, Dickens's brother-in-law.

7. The Young Jolly Waterman (3.11)  A piece by Charles Dibdin, dramatist and songwriter, from his ballad opera The Waterrman. It is sung in The Pickwick Papers

8. The Soldier's Tear (3.44) A sentimental song in the great Victorian tradition. Reference is made to the song in Our Mutual Friend

9. Old Towler (3.04) A favourite hunting song written by John O'Keeffe, to which Dickens refers in Our Mutual Friend

10. The Fine Old English Gentleman (New Version) (3.23) Dickens wrote this savage satirical ballad ('to be said or sung at all Conservative dinners') for the liberal journal The Examiner; it was published in August 1841 The song is a parody of a popular ditty about a Fine Old English Gentleman who, 'while he feasted all the great,/ He ne'er forgot the small.' 

11. The David Copperfield Polkas (4.40) Composed by W. Wilson, these were among many melodies put out by Victorian music publishers to exploit the sales potential of Dickens's name. The tunes take their titles from characters in David Copperfield

12. All's Well (3.54) A duet from The English Fleet (1805) with lyrics by Thomas Dibdin and music by JohnBraham. Dickens refers to the song in Our Mutual Friend (Bk 3 Ch.7), and in The Old Curiosity Shop

13. A Country Life (3.30) A song written by Dickens for the comic operetta The Village Coquettes

14. Shiverand Shakery, the Man that Couldn't Get Warm (3.34) A comic song by Jacon Beuler with accompaniment by J. Clinton, to which Dickens refers in 'Dr Marigold's Prescription' in the Christmas Stories

15. Mr Wardle's Carol (4.12) A carol written by Dickens and sung in The Pickwick Papers by Mr Wardle during Christmas festivities at Dingley Dell.

16. The Christmas Carol Quadrilles (5.39) A set of tunes 'composed and dedicated to Charles Dickens Esq. by Edwin Merriott' according to the score.

17. Believe Me if All Those Endearing Young Charms (2.27) One of the great 19th-century love songs, written by the poet Thomas Moore whose Irish Melodies had a special attraction to Dickens. Mention is made of the song in The Old Curiosity Shop and in Bleak House

18. The Workhouse Boy (2.37) Comic and gruesome ballad of a workhouse boy who disappears on Christmas Eve only to be found later in the stewpot.

19. A Child's Hymn (2.26) Possibly written by Dickens himself, this hymn appeared in the Christmas number of Household Words for 1856.

20. Sir Roger de Coverley (4.51) The most famous of all English country dance tunes, often played at the end of a ball. A fiddler strikes up the tune to conclude Mr Fezziwig's party in A Christmas Carol and Dickens's delight in the dance is evident from his many references to it in his letters.
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Works on This Recording

1. College Hornpipe by Traditional
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
Written: USA 
2. The Village Coquettes: Some Folks Who Have Grown Old by John Hullah
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
3. The Ratcatcher's Daughter by Edward Bradley
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
4. Home, Sweet Home by Henry Bishop
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
5. Begone Dull Care, folk song by Traditional
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
6. The Ivy Green by Henry Burnett
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
Notes: Text from The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens. The setting is by Henry Burnett, Dickens's brother-in-law. 
7. The Waterrman: The Young Jolly Waterman by Charles Dibdin
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
8. The Soldier's Tear by George Alexander Lee
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
9. Old Towler by John O'Keeffe
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
10. The Fine Old English Gentleman (New Version) by Charles Dickens
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
11. The David Copperfield Polkas by W. Wilson
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
12. The English Fleet: All's Well by John Braham
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
13. The Village Coquettes: A Country Life by John Hullah
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
Notes: Set to text by Charles Dickens 
14. Shiverand Shakery, the Man that Couldn't Get Warm by Jacon Beuler
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
15. The Pickwick Papers: Mr Wardle's Carol by Charles Dickens
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
16. The Christmas Carol Quadrilles by Edwin Merriott
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
17. Believe me, if all those endearing young charms by Thomas Moore
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
18. The Workhouse Boy by Traditional
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
19. Household Words: A Child's Hymn by Charles Dickens
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band
20. Sir Roger de Coverley by Traditional
Conductor:  Dave Townsend
Orchestra/Ensemble:  The Seven Dials Band

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