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PentaTone - The First 10 Years

Fischer / Janowski /Kodama / Kreizberg
Release Date: 09/27/2011 
Label:  Pentatone   Catalog #: 5186500   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Antonín DvorákAram KhachaturianSergei ProkofievAlexander Glazunov,   ... 
Performer:  Julia FischerSa ChenArabella SteinbacherBram Beekman,   ... 
Conductor:  Yakov KreizbergSimon MurphyLawrence FosterMarek Janowski,   ... 
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Netherlands Philharmonic OrchestraRussian National OrchestraChamber Soloists of The New Dutch Academy,   ... 
Number of Discs: 11 
Recorded in: Multi 
Length: 12 Hours 47 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews

This is a hybrid Super Audio CD playable on both regular and Super Audio CD players.

10-SACD set plus 1 bonus SACD

Celebrating over a decade of quality releases is PentaTone's newest compilation, PentaTone: The First 10 Years. This 10-disc set, recorded in SACD sound for superior quality, features all of your favorite PentaTone performances, including those from Marek Janowski, Sa Chen, Arabella Steinbacher, Mari Kodama, Martin Helmchen, and more! Listen to the best of PentaTone in celebration of their first decade of business.

Reviews of some of the original recordings that make up this set:

Russian Violin Concertos
I first heard Julia Fischer in 1995 as
Read more a 12-year-old in the Yehudi Menuhin Violin Competition. Not only did she win outright in the junior category, she was manifestly more inspired than anyone in the senior category. A DVD of The Four Seasons aside (BBC/Opus Arte, 12/02), we have had to wait until now for her first CD. As she explains in the booklet-notes, she has an abiding love of the Khachaturian Concerto, a work she found impossible to sell to concert-promoters.

The freshness of her way with the Khachaturian, recorded last May in Moscow, is immediately striking in the chattering figuration of the opening, and she brings a rare tenderness to the lyrical second subject. The orchestral sound is impressive, too. Though Itzhak Perlman and Lydia Mordkovitch produce a beefier sound, the refinement of Fischer’s performance makes it equally compelling. This concerto has claims to be the composer’s finest work, claims which the yearning tenderness of the slow movement support. The clarity of Fischer’s performance in the finale brings lightness and sparkle.

In the Glazunov, too, it is the clarity and subtlety of Fischer’s playing that marks her reading out. She finds the tenderness of the slow middle section of this one-movement work, and gives an easy swing to the bouncy rhythms of the final section. In the Prokofiev, she takes a meditative view of the wistful melodies, the element, she says, that most attracts her, even if she does not quite reach the depths of Kyung-Wha Chung’s version.

A unique coupling, superbly recorded, that could hardly be more recommendable.

– Edward Greenfield, Gramophone

Dvorak's Symphony No 9
Yakov Kreizberg conducts really fine performances of these two repertoire favorites. Although the "New World" Symphony gets relatively traditional treatment (big slow-down for the first movement's second subject, for example), it's within a general framework of exciting tempos, characterful phrasing, and very good playing from the Netherlands Philharmonic. The Largo is beautifully poised, and note how Kreizberg doesn't overplay the big climax, making the brass obey Dvorák's careful dynamic markings and demonstrating impressive understanding of this passage's context. The scherzo has rhythmic energy aplenty, the central trio is not too slow, and the finale, if slightly heavier-footed than the rest of the symphony, comes to an imposing conclusion, with the final cyclical combination of themes ground out like a soul in pain. It's a potent reminder of the fact that the ending is, at the very least, emotionally ambivalent.

Despite spectacular percussion playing in the battle sequences, this Romeo and Juliet is most memorable for Kreizberg's supremely natural, intelligent phrasing of the love music. He does it as well as anyone has, at a decently flowing tempo, and if the strings don't pant and heave as in Russian orchestras, their lighter touch conveys its own youthful and vibrant impression of the tragic protagonists. The coda also offers some really lovely wind playing and a truly transfiguring apotheosis. In stereo this live recording sounds gorgeous, but DSD multichannel format offers even more precise instrumental positioning and greater front-to-back depth, all with brilliant highs and a rock-solid bass. But make no mistake, even without the audiophile credentials the quality of the music-making on offer speaks for itself.

– David Hurwitz, ClassicsToday.com

Mozart: Piano Concertos No 24 And 13
This is the debut CD of Martin Helmchen, prize-winning 25-year old German pianist whose career received a boost when he won the 2001 Clara Haskil Competition. Though opening salvos fired by so many young pianists today often come in the form of Mozart, it can be a risky business; bad Mozart-playing can signal the quick end to a career because the nature of the music exposes so many strengths and flaws. Even now we see so many CDs released by “name” piano-players who really don’t have a clue as to how to handle the composer. Helmchen, I am happy to report, has found the key to the puzzle, and acquits himself very well indeed.

I compared this to three other recordings, just to get some sort of benchmark. No. 24 is perhaps Mozart’s more operatic piano concerto, the opening as Don Giovanni -like as anything he wrote, and then the big dramatic entrance of the piano, just like the entrance of a soprano. It all has to be done properly or the effect is ruined. Clara Haskil in her early sixties recording understood this, and that recording has stood for some as the bar to be reached. But there have been other fine recordings, and George Szell and Robert Casadesus certainly achieve great things for the most part, though I am not as happy with that pianist’s first statement. More recently an EMI recording with Piotr Anderszewski and the Sinfonia Varsovia shows the pianist hitting his stride in just the right manner, but the sound is slightly bloomy and receded. Helmchen and forces are on spot. The opening strings have to sound dark and mysterious, and this is best achieved by making the articulation legato and less detached; this makes the opening forte with the brass more effective and striking, especially if they come in with a sharper distance and greater staccato between the chords.

The sound on this issue is sumptuous; you will not hear finer, more articulate clarity in the orchestra on any other recording that I know of, and the piano sounds simply marvelous, clean, bold, and rich. The surround is very effective, truly enhancing the vagaries of the listening space, and providing a direct and effective aural focus.

Helmchen completes this recital with the first concerto of Mozart he ever played, the lighter and more playful No. 13, though hardly baby-banter either. This was one of a trilogy that Mozart wrote in 1782 after the first flush of Abduction from the Seraglio success, and he even scored the work so that the lack of wind instruments would not be a barrier to performance or sensation. To those who subscribed to his “Academies” he offered the concertos as manuscript copies. These deals proved quite lucrative for the composer, and brought a large number of people to his concerts.

This sunny C-Major work is not in the same league either in profundity or technically as some of the later more mature pieces, but it is still immensely enjoyable (as are all of the concertos), and one can see brave amateurs tackling the work in their homes and parlors. Helmchen plays it with all due seriousness and jollity, bringing out the piece’s inner counterpoint and lovely lines (and jokes) with a tongue-in-cheek wit that bodes well for his approach to this composer in general. This is well worth hearing for those just building a collection or those with 5,000 Mozart concerto discs already in their collection. I suppose those people will buy anything anyway, but this is one they needn’t feel will uselessly occupy shelf space. Unreservedly recommended."

FANFARE: Steven E. Ritter

Gordon Getty: Orchestral Works
Gordon Getty, who describes himself as “two-thirds a 19th-century composer,” is nevertheless a creative and original one and, as this CD proves, the other one-third makes its presence felt often enough to provide interest and flexibility.


The CD opens with the overture to his opera Plump Jack, based on Shakespeare’s Falstaff, and it succinctly summarizes the fat knight’s journey from fellow mischief-maker of Prince Hal to his being banished by Hal when the latter becomes King Henry V. As such, it does its job very well and thus can stand on its own as a concert piece sans opera. If I have one reservation about it, in fact, it is that it seems to me to work better as a tone poem than an overture. It goes through several tempo and key changes in its journey, shifting its moods and story with interest and a rich palette of orchestral colors.


Ancestor Suite is a ballet loosely based on Edgar Allan Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher, premiered in Moscow in 2009. Here, Getty’s music is not so resolutely tonal, but rather points up the macabre aspects of Poe’s story with relish. Divided into 11 sections, the suite focuses, appropriately, on dances (waltzes, a Schottische, polka, gavotte, and march), but always with eerie overtones. In the opening waltz, for instance, one hears a fragmenting of both the melody and its orchestration in a way that harkens back to Stravinsky’s neoclassic period as well as Copland. The “Waltz of the Ancestors” has a sort of clumsy, galumphing quality reminiscent of the “Dance of the Knights” in Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet. The Schottische dances its way through ambiguous tonality (also like Prokofiev) while the Waltz-Ländler has a fragmented, almost uncertain quality to it. The theme representing Madeline Usher, the mad but pure member of the family, has a tender but skewered quality to it, not unlike portions of Copland’s Rodeo. Getty’s music always seems to be on the verge of a tune, but his restless and quite original sense of imagination keeps such tunes from developing and thus running the risk of becoming cloying. Getty’s music is very “open,” both in form and orchestration, which creates a moment-to-moment fascination, and even in this ballet score, a wry sense of humor.


Tiefer und Tiefer (Deeper and Deeper), given here in Getty’s arrangement for string orchestra, is also used in his Three Waltzes for Piano and Orchestra. Melodically, it is quite simple; harmonically, it is quite discursive, composed of six-bar segments that shift tonality at or within almost every phrase. Homework is an orchestrated version of one of his earliest piano pieces, written in 1964 while he was still a student. One can hear quite clearly here his musical debts to Copland and Thomson, and if the music is less developed than his later works it certainly has charm in abundance. The Fiddler of Ballykeel and Raise the Colors are exuberant, outgoing, celebratory works in regular rhythms and full orchestral colors, a fitting conclusion to this CD.


The performances by Neville Marriner and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields display this orchestra’s metamorphosis from its chamber roots in the 1960s to its more robust sound today. PentaTone’s sound, undeniably resonant as a result of SACD mastering, is nevertheless clear and transparent at all times.


FANFARE: Lynn René Bayley
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Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony no 9 in E minor, Op. 95/B 178 "From the New World" by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Yakov Kreizberg
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1893; USA 
Date of Recording: 01/2003 
Venue:  Concertgebouw, Amsterdam 
Length: 45 Minutes 24 Secs. 
2.
Concerto for Violin in D minor by Aram Khachaturian
Performer:  Julia Fischer (Violin)
Conductor:  Yakov Kreizberg
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1940; USSR 
Date of Recording: 05/2004 
Venue:  DZZ Studio 5, Moscow 
Length: 36 Minutes 6 Secs. 
3.
Concerto for Violin no 1 in D major, Op. 19 by Sergei Prokofiev
Performer:  Julia Fischer (Violin)
Conductor:  Yakov Kreizberg
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian National Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1916-1917; Russia 
Date of Recording: 05/2004 
Venue:  DZZ Studio 5, Moscow 
Length: 22 Minutes 5 Secs. 
4.
Concerto for Violin in A minor, Op. 82 by Alexander Glazunov
Performer:  Julia Fischer (Violin)
Conductor:  Yakov Kreizberg
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1904; Russia 
Length: 24 Minutes 17 Secs. 
5.
Symphony in D major, Op. 1 No. 1 by Joseph Schmitt
Conductor:  Simon Murphy
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Soloists of The New Dutch Academy
Date of Recording: 03/2004 
Venue:  Oud-Katholieke Kerk, The Hague, The Neth 
Length: 14 Minutes 29 Secs. 
6.
Symphony in B flat major, Op. 6 No. 2 by Joseph Schmitt
Conductor:  Simon Murphy
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Soloists of The New Dutch Academy
Date of Recording: 03/2004 
Venue:  Oud-Katholieke Kerk, The Hague, The Neth 
Length: 8 Minutes 28 Secs. 
7.
Symphony in G major ("Symfonie Periodique No. 1") by Joseph Schmitt
Conductor:  Simon Murphy
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Soloists of The New Dutch Academy
Date of Recording: 03/2004 
Venue:  Oud-Katholieke Kerk, The Hague, The Neth 
Length: 10 Minutes 30 Secs. 
8.
Quartet for flute, violin, viola & cello in E minor, Op. 3/3 by Joseph Schmitt
Conductor:  Simon Murphy
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Soloists of The New Dutch Academy
Date of Recording: 03/2004 
Venue:  Oud-Katholieke Kerk, The Hague, The Neth 
Length: 17 Minutes 1 Secs. 
9.
Quartet for flute, violin, viola & cello in G major, Op. 3/6 by Joseph Schmitt
Conductor:  Simon Murphy
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Soloists of The New Dutch Academy
Date of Recording: 03/2004 
Venue:  Oud-Katholieke Kerk, The Hague, The Neth 
Length: 12 Minutes 40 Secs. 
10.
Symphony in E flat major ("The Hurdy Gurdy") by Joseph Schmitt
Conductor:  Simon Murphy
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Soloists of The New Dutch Academy
Date of Recording: 03/2004 
Venue:  Oud-Katholieke Kerk, The Hague, The Neth 
Length: 14 Minutes 15 Secs. 
11.
Concerto for Piano no 1 in E minor, B 53/Op. 11 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Sa Chen (Piano)
Conductor:  Lawrence Foster
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Gulbenkian Foundation Symphony Orchestra Lisbon
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1830; Poland 
Date of Recording: 07/2008 
Venue:  Grand Auditorium, Gulbenkian Foundation, 
Length: 40 Minutes 18 Secs. 
12.
Concerto for Piano no 2 in F minor, B 43/Op. 21 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Sa Chen (Piano)
Conductor:  Lawrence Foster
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829-1830; Poland 
Date of Recording: 07/2008 
Venue:  Grand Auditorium, Gulbenkian Foundation, 
Length: 32 Minutes 47 Secs. 
13.
Concerto for Violin no 1, Op. 35 by Karol Szymanowski
Performer:  Arabella Steinbacher (Violin)
Conductor:  Marek Janowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1916; Poland 
Date of Recording: 05/2009 
Venue:  Haus des Rundfunks, Berlin 
Length: 12 Minutes 32 Secs. 
14.
Romance for Violin and Orchestra in F minor, Op. 11/B 39 by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Arabella Steinbacher (Violin)
Conductor:  Marek Janowski
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1873-1877; Bohemia 
Date of Recording: 05/2009 
Venue:  Haus des Rundfunks, Berlin 
Length: 11 Minutes 52 Secs. 
15.
Concerto for Violin in A minor, Op. 53 by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Arabella Steinbacher (Violin)
Conductor:  Marek Janowski
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879-1880; Bohemia 
Date of Recording: 05/2009 
Venue:  Haus des Rundfunks, Berlin 
Length: 33 Minutes 35 Secs. 
16.
Overture "Plump Jack" by Gordon Getty
Conductor:  Sir Neville Marriner
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 04/2009 
Venue:  Air Lyndhurst Studios, Hampstead, Englan 
Length: 12 Minutes 10 Secs. 
17.
Ancestor Suite by Gordon Getty
Conductor:  Sir Neville Marriner
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 04/2009 
Venue:  Air Lyndhurst Studios, Hampstead, Englan 
Length: 29 Minutes 26 Secs. 
18.
Tiefer und Tiefer by Gordon Getty
Conductor:  Sir Neville Marriner
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 04/2009 
Venue:  Air Lyndhurst Studios, Hampstead, Englan 
Length: 4 Minutes 12 Secs. 
19.
Homework Suite, for orchestra by Gordon Getty
Conductor:  Sir Neville Marriner
Period: Modern 
Date of Recording: 04/2009 
Venue:  Air Lyndhurst Studios, Hampstead, Englan 
Length: 5 Minutes 29 Secs. 
20.
The Fiddler of Ballykeel by Gordon Getty
Conductor:  Sir Neville Marriner
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 04/2009 
Venue:  Air Lyndhurst Studios, Hampstead, Englan 
Length: 3 Minutes 2 Secs. 
21.
Raise the Colors by Gordon Getty
Conductor:  Sir Neville Marriner
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 04/2009 
Venue:  Air Lyndhurst Studios, Hampstead, Englan 
Length: 2 Minutes 34 Secs. 
22.
Symphony no 7 in E major, WAB 107 by Anton Bruckner
Conductor:  Marek Janowski
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881-1883; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 10/2010 
Venue:  Victoria Hall, Geneva, Switzerland 
Length: 65 Minutes 21 Secs. 
23.
Symphony no 2 in D major, Op. 73: 3rd movement, Allegro grazioso by Johannes Brahms
Conductor:  Hans Vonk
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877; Austria 
Length: 5 Minutes 12 Secs. 
24.
Concerti grossi (12), Op. 6: no 4 in D major - Allegro by Arcangelo Corelli
Conductor:  Simon Murphy
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Dutch Academy
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1708-1712; Rome, Italy 
Length: 3 Minutes 17 Secs. 
25.
Symphony No. 44 in E minor, Hob.1:44 "Trauersymphonie": Allegro con brio by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Marco Boni
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1772 
Length: 6 Minutes 35 Secs. 
26.
Sinfonia a Quattro in F major: Tempo di Minuetto by Johann Wenzel Stamitz
Conductor:  Simon Murphy
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Dutch Academy
Period: Classical 
Written: circa 1750 
Length: 4 Minutes 13 Secs. 
27.
Requiem, Op. 48: In paradisum by Gabriel Fauré
Conductor:  Ed Spanjaard
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1887-1890; France 
Length: 3 Minutes 1 Secs. 
28.
Pelléas et Mélisande, Op. 80: Sicilienne by Gabriel Fauré
Conductor:  Yakov Kreizberg
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1898; France 
Length: 3 Minutes 34 Secs. 
29.
Choral Prelude for organ, "Hilft Herr Jesu Lass Geling" by Gottfried August Homilius
Performer:  Bram Beekman (Organ)
Period: Baroque 
Length: 2 Minutes 36 Secs. 
30.
Lohengrin: Act 3 Prelude by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Yakov Kreizberg
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1847; Germany 
Length: 3 Minutes 22 Secs. 
31.
Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Conductor:  Marco Boni
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/2002 
Venue:  Waalse Kerk, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Length: 30 Minutes 58 Secs. 
32.
Sextet for Strings in D major, Op. 70 "Souvenir de Florence" by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Conductor:  Marco Boni
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1890/1892; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/2002 
Venue:  Waalse Kerk, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Length: 35 Minutes 27 Secs. 
33.
Romeo and Juliet Overture by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Conductor:  Yakov Kreizberg
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1869/1880; Russia 
Date of Recording: 06/2003 
Venue:  Concertgebouw, Amsterdam 
Length: 21 Minutes 13 Secs. 
34.
Sonata for Piano no 16 in G major, Op. 31 no 1 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Mari Kodama (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1802; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/2004 
Venue:  Doopsgezinde Kerk, Haarlem, The Netherla 
Length: 25 Minutes 4 Secs. 
35.
Sonata for Piano no 17 in D minor, Op. 31 no 2 "Tempest" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Mari Kodama (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1802; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/2004 
Venue:  Doopsgezinde Kerk, Haarlem, The Netherla 
Length: 23 Minutes 45 Secs. 
36.
Sonata for Piano no 18 in E flat major, Op. 31 no 3 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Mari Kodama (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1802; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/2004 
Venue:  Doopsgezinde Kerk, Haarlem, The Netherla 
Length: 21 Minutes 47 Secs. 
37.
Concerto for Piano no 24 in C minor, K 491 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Martin Helmchen (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/2007 
Venue:  Philharmonie, Haarlem, The Netherlands 
Length: 31 Minutes 12 Secs. 
38.
Concerto for Piano no 13 in C major, K 415 (387b) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Martin Helmchen (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1782-1783; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/2007 
Venue:  Philharmonie, Haarlem, The Netherlands 
Length: 28 Minutes 55 Secs. 
39.
Sonata for Piano no 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 27 no 2 "Moonlight": 1st movement, Adagio sostenuto by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Mari Kodama (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1801; Vienna, Austria 
Length: 5 Minutes 48 Secs. 
40.
Adagio for Violin and Orchestra in E major, K 261 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Julia Fischer (Violin)
Conductor:  Yakov Kreizberg
Written: 1776 
Length: 7 Minutes 57 Secs. 
41.
Concerto for Clarinet in A major, K 622: 3rd movement, Rondo by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Andrew Marriner (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Sir Neville Marriner
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; Vienna, Austria 
Length: 8 Minutes 32 Secs. 
42.
Concerto for Piano no 2 in A major: 2nd movement, Andante grazioso, "Espaniola" by Carl Loewe
Performer:  Mari Kodama (Piano)
Conductor:  Kent Nagano
Period: Romantic 
Written: by 1831; Germany 
Length: 7 Minutes 47 Secs. 
43.
Cantata No. 2, Op. 36 "At the Reading of a Psalm": Double Chorus by Sergei Taneyev
Conductor:  Mikhail Pletnev
Period: Post-Romantic 
Written: 1912-1915 
Length: 4 Minutes 57 Secs. 

Sound Samples

Serenade in C major, Op. 48: I. Pezzo in forma di Sonatina
Serenade in C major, Op. 48: II. Walzer
Serenade in C major, Op. 48: III. Elegie
Serenade in C major, Op. 48: IV. Finale
Souvenir de Florence, Op. 70 (version for string orchestra): I. Allegro con spirito
Souvenir de Florence, Op. 70 (version for string orchestra): II. Adagio cantabile
Souvenir de Florence, Op. 70 (version for string orchestra): III. Allegretto moderato
Souvenir de Florence, Op. 70 (version for string orchestra): IV. Allegro vivace
Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, B. 178, "From the New World": I. Adagio - Allegro molto
Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, B. 178, "From the New World": II. Largo
Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, B. 178, "From the New World": III. Scherzo: Molto vivace
Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, B. 178, "From the New World": IV. Allegro con fuoco
Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture (3rd version, 1880)

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