Bruce Ford

Biography

Born: August 15, 1956; Lubbock, TX  
Bruce Ford is known as one of the finest bel canto tenors of his generation and is a luminary in the Rossini and Donizetti revival of the '90s onward, as well as in Mozart. He first studied voice at West State University in Canyon, TX, and later at Texas Tech University. He was admitted to the Houston Opera Studio (the training company of the Houston Grand Opera), where he studied under Elena Nikolaidi and John Gillas. He made his stage debut at Read more the HGO as the abbot in Cilea's Adriana Lecouvreur (a comprimario role), as well as singing in the American premiere of Philip Glass' The Madrigal Opera in 1981 and the world premiere of Carlisle Floyd's Willie Stark. He appeared in various small and medium-sized theaters in Europe and the United States during the early '80s, including the Minnesota Opera where he sang Peccadillo in the world premiere of P.D.Q. Bach's (Peter Schickele) The Abduction of Figaro. He made his Wexford debut in 1986 as Argirio in Rossini's Tancredi, which brought him to wider attention in the bel canto field. He began his long association with the Pesaro Festival in 1990 and in 1991, he made his Covent Garden debut as Count Almaviva in Rossini's The Barber of Seville. He sang Ernesto for his Chicago Lyric Opera debut in 1995. His Metropolitan Opera debut came in 1997 as Almaviva. He has recorded widely, often in world-premiere recordings of forgotten bel canto operas. Read less

Biography

Born: August 15, 1956; Lubbock, TX  
Bruce Ford is known as one of the finest bel canto tenors of his generation and is a luminary in the Rossini and Donizetti revival of the '90s onward, as well as in Mozart. He first studied voice at West State University in Canyon, TX, and later at Texas Tech University. He was admitted to the Houston Opera Studio (the training company of the Houston Grand Opera), where he studied under Elena Nikolaidi and John Gillas. He made his stage debut at Read more
WORKS ALBUMS
TITLE/COMPOSER
LABEL
Overture
Act I Scene 1: Recitative: When will the gods release me (Ilia)
Act I Scene 1: Aria: Father, my brothers, forgive me! (Chorus)
Act I Scene 1: Recitative: Ah! He is coming (Idamante, Ilia)
Act I Scene 2: Aria: I am guiltless and yet you blame me (Idamante)
Act I Scene 2: Recitative: Here are the few wretched Trojan victims (Ilia, Idamante)
Act I Scene 3: The war is over (Chorus)
Act I Scene 4: Recitative: Prince, my lord, you insult the Greek nation (Electra, Idamante, Arbace, Ilia)
Act I Scene 6: The King dies. . . and I am friendless! (Electra)
Act I Scene 6: Aria: I feel you writhe inside me (Electra)
Act I Scene 7: Relent! Heaven, relent! (Chorus)
Act I Scene 8: Recitative: Pantomime - We have been saved at last (Idomeneo)
Act I Scene 9: Aria: The ghost of my victim (Idomeneo)
Act I Scene 10: This lonely shore (Idamante, Idomeneo)
Act I Scene 10: Aria: The father I love dearly (Idamante)
Intermezzo: March - May Neptune be honoured (Chorus)
Act II Scene 1: We are alone; listen, Arbace (Idomeneo, Arbace, Ilia)
Act II Scene 2: Aria: My father was taken (Ilia)
Act II Scene 3: Recitative: How should I interpret words so ambiguous and disturbing? (Idomeneo)
Act II Scene 3: Aria: Saved from storms, the storm within me rages (Idomeneo)
Act II Scene 4: Recitative: What pleasure could be deeper than mine is? (Electra)
Act II Scene 4: Aria: Dearest creature, that I know you love another cannot hurt me (Electra)
Act III Scene 10: Aria: The woes of my brother invade and destroy me (Electra)
Act III Finale: Recitative: Cretans: this shall be the last decree Idomeneo will pronounce (Idomeneo)
Act III Finale: Bless their love, bless their devotion (Chorus)
Overture
Act I Scene 1: Introduction: Piano, pianissimo (Fiorello, The Count, Chorus)
Act I Scene 1: Cavatina: See how the smile of heaven (The Count)
Act I Scene 1: Hey, Fiorello! (The Count, Fiorello, Chorus)
Act I Scene 1: Thank you, thank you (Fiorello, The Count, Chorus)
Act I Scene 1: Recitative: What common people! (The Count, Fiorello)
Act I Scene 2: Cavatina: La la la lera (Figaro)
Act I Scene 2: Recitative: Ah ha! What could be better? (Figaro, The Count)
Act I Scene 3: I cannot see him anywhere (Rosina, The Count, Bartolo, Figaro)
Act I Scene 4: Poor little innocent creature! (The Count, Figaro, Bartolo)
Act I Scene 4: Canzone: My poor heart is so full of emotion (The Count, Rosina, Figaro)
Act I Scene 4: Recitative: What's happened? (The Count, Figaro)
Act I Scene 4: Duet: You need only mention money (Figaro, The Count)
Act I Scene 5: Cavatina: In my heart a gentle voice (Rosina)
Act I Scene 5: I can be so demure (Rosina)
Act I Scene 5: Recitative: Oh yes, I'll win the day (Rosina)
Act I Scene 6: Good morning, Signorina (Figaro, Rosina)
Act I Scene 7: Where would I be without him? (Rosina, Bartolo)
Act I Scene 8: Who'd know? (Bartolo, Basilio)
Act I Scene 8: Aria: Innuendo, the slightest whisper (Basilio)
Act I Scene 8: Recitative: Well, what d'you think? (Basilio, Bartolo)
Act I Scene 9: So that's it! (Figaro, Rosina)
Act I Scene 9: Duet: Then it's me ... (Rosina, Figaro)
Act I Scene 10: Recitative: Now I feel so much better (Rosina, Bartolo)
Act I Scene 10: Aria: Dare you offer such excuses (Bartolo)
Act II Scene 9: Recitative: Ah! That's all we needed! (Figaro, The Count, Rosina)
Act II Scene 10: Don Bartolo (Basilio, Figaro, The Count, Rosina)
Act II Scene 10: Last Scene: Don't move a muscle! (Bartolo, Figaro, Officer, The Count)
Act II Scene 10: Finaletto II: I love a happy ending (Figaro, Berta, Bartolo, Basilio, Rosina, The Count, Chorus)


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