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Szymon Goldberg Vol 2 - Commercial Recordings 1932-1951

Bach,J.s. / Jones / Berlin Po Quartet
Release Date: 10/30/2012 
Label:  Music & Arts   Catalog #: 1225   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Johann Sebastian BachFranz Joseph HaydnWolfgang Amadeus MozartGeorge Frideric Handel,   ... 
Performer:  Szymon GoldbergGerald MooreAnthony PiniLili Kraus,   ... 
Conductor:  Walter SusskindAlois MelicharPaul Kletzki
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia OrchestraBerlin Philharmonic OrchestraBerlin Philharmonic Orchestra members,   ... 
Number of Discs: 8 
Recorded in: Mono 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews



SZYMON GOLDBERG CENTENARY, VOLUME 2: COMMERCIAL RECORDINGS, 1932-1951 Szymon Goldberg (vn); Walter Susskind 1 , cond; Philharmonia O. 1 Alois Melichar, cond; 2 Berlin PO; 2 Gerald Moore (pn 3 ); Berlin P Str Qrt; 4 Lili Kraus Read more (pn 5 ); Anthony Pini (vc 5 ); Árpád Sándor (pn 6 ); Paul Kletzki, cond; 7 Members of the Berlin PO. 7 Frederick Riddle (va 8 ); Paul Hindemith (va 9 ); Lili Krauss (pn 10 ); Emanuel Feuermann (vc 11 ); Berlin PO C Ens 12 MUSIC & ARTS 1225, mono/analog (8 CDs: 592:02)


BACH 1 Violin Concertos: No. 1; No. 2. 2 Brandenburg Concertos: No. 1; No. 2; No. 4. HANDEL 3 Violin Sonata in D. HAYDN 1 Violin Concerto No. 1 in G. 4 String Quartet No. 17 in E (attrib. Hoffstetter). 5 Piano Trios: in f?; in C; in E?. PARADIS 6 Sicilienne (arr. Dushkin). MOZART Violin Concertos: 1 No. 3; 1 No. 4; 7 No. 5: Adagio. Violin and Viola Duos: 8 No. 1; 9 No. 2. 10 Violin Sonatas: in C, K 296; in F, K 377; in G, K 379; in E?, K 380; in B?, K 378; in C, K 404; in E?, K 481. 10 Serenade No. 7 in D, K 250 (arr. Kreisler). 10 BEETHOVEN Violin Sonatas: No. 2; No. 5, “Spring”; No. 6; No. 9, “Kreutzer”; No. 10. 9,11 Serenade, Op. 8. 4 String Quartet, Op. 18/5: Andante cantabile. 12 String Septet, Op. 29. 4 DVO?ÁK String Quartet , Op. 96: Lento. 6 Slavonic Dance in e, Op. 46/2. 9,11 HINDEMITH String Trio No. 2


If the sound of the solo violin seems recessed into the orchestra at the beginning of the first movement of Johann Sebastian Bach’s Violin Concerto in A Minor, it soon becomes apparent that it’s a tone of great flexibility, wielded in a performance of the subtlest musical intelligence. Two of the violin’s historians, Boris Schwarz and Henry Roth, noted Szymon Goldberg’s sterling musicality, Roth calling it “aristocratic” and Schwarz likening Goldberg to Joseph Szigeti in his felicitous fusion of technique and interpretation. In fact, although Goldberg possessed a soloist’s tonal and technical equipment, he often preferred chamber music; and the partnership at the heart of chamber music may have made him particularly expressive in movements like the Bach concerto’s Andante , in which his insightful tonal inflections raise the performance to a level far above even the extraordinary. The finale’s sprightly, but some of the solos, particularly those dipping into the lower registers, exhibit the same nuance that marked his reading of the slow movement—and the arpeggiated passagework seems overwhelming in its impact.


The Second Concerto, perhaps itself a bit more extroverted, receives an exuberant reading, with Ernest Lush’s harpsichord continuo brought more prominently forward than Geraint Jones’s in the A-Minor Concerto—so much so that at times Goldberg seems to be engaging in a duet. But, as in that First Concerto, Walter Susskind (with the Philharmonia Orchestra) proves an alert accompanist—and a timeless one, too, because, despite the period performance movement, these readings still seem unaffected, unmannered, and crisp when appropriate. Once again, the slow movement, taken at a somewhat slow tempo, probes well below the surface, yielding moments that should make even those familiar with the work and a decent number of its best recordings awaken to take notice. At times the partnership with the orchestra, as well as the harpsichord, seems almost uncanny. In recordings like these—as in Mischa Elman’s reading of the concerto (from the 1930s with John Barbirolli or decades later with Vladimir Golschmann)—individual insight trumps doctrine. That level of insight continues in the third movement, which Goldberg makes sound very violinistic indeed.


These commercial recordings, transferred by Mark Obert-Thorn from shellac pressings (duos by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and trios by Ludwig van Beethoven and Paul Hindemith) and CD-Rs, appear in the second installment of Goldberg’s legacy for Music and Arts—the first appeared in 2009, Fanfare 33:3. The recorded sound varies considerably; in fact, the first of Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto s (with Alois Melichar and the Berlin Philharmonic from 1933) comes as a sort of shock after the surprisingly lifelike engineering of the two violin concertos from 1951. Still, the violin solo from the second movement comes through with great vibrancy and timbral variety—unlike Gustav Kern’s oboe, which sounds pinched and tinny. Some may feel that the first movement’s just a bit too heavy-handed (the finale, as well), but the slow movement levitates weightlessly. The Allegro sounds energetic, and the Menuetto movement, elegant. In the Second Concerto (even earlier—1932), the wizened recorded sound hardly allows the soloists (Paul Spörri, trumpet; Albert Harzer, flute; Gustav Kern, oboe; and Hans Bottermund, cello—as well as Goldberg) to blossom, although the energy of the first movement becomes more and more apparent as the engineering recedes into the background for the listener. Still, both the oboe and the violin come across fairly well in the slow movement, and Spörri’s upper registers do, too, in the finale.


The second disc brings the Fourth Brandenburg Concerto, the violin part of which demands a more brilliant technique than do any of the violin concertos—even the reconstructed ones. The recorded sound seems about the least flattering to the soloists (Albert Harzer and Heinrich Breiden, flute—and, of course, Goldberg) so far in the series. That may in part explain why Goldberg’s reading of the swirling violin part seems so small in scale, though finely chiseled, in the first movement. At least the recorded sound’s clear, so the solos emerge fairly well in the slow movement. The finale proceeds at a fairly moderate tempo in this movement, but the solos, which the engineers managed to capture in livelier recorded sound, impart to the performance a sparkling energy—and Goldberg’s détaché, as always, exhibits a kaleidoscopic variety of timbres. The lower registers of the orchestra have considerable body and substance in the recorded sound image.


Jump to 1947 for Goldberg’s recording of George Frideric Handel’s famous Violin Sonata in D Major with Gerald Moore. But the jump won’t include a jump to greater fidelity in the recorded sound. Once again, however, listeners should be able to warm to Goldberg’s noble manner in this sonata once they’ve accustomed themselves to the ragged image, which nevertheless transmits the richness of Goldberg’s tone in his lower registers (Roth commented that while Goldberg produced a richly romantic sound, he remained a classicist in his choice of repertoire). Moore once again proves himself a judicious accompanist, unostentatiously supporting Goldberg’s solo part in the slow movement (no doubled octaves in the bass)—surely a treasure for all listeners, not just to violinists or aficionados of the instrument. Also from 1947 comes Goldberg’s recording of Franz Joseph Haydn’s First Violin Concerto—as with Bach’s solo concertos in the collection, accompanied by Susskind and the Philharmonia. Here the engineering’s much more realistic, with the violin placed far in front of the orchestra, as it would be the same year in Isaac Stern’s comparatively unnuanced reading for Columbia, though Goldberg’s tone sounds leaner and a bit less robust. Those who admire his approach to Mozart should appreciate his lithe energy and lively musical intelligence in this concerto, in the first movement of which he transforms some passagework that often sounds routine. His cadenza in the first movement, exceptionally long and complex technically, pays tribute to his instrumental mastery if not to any sense of propriety. In movements like the concerto’s simple, aria-like Adagio , however, Goldberg’s approaches sublimity. A ruddy energy marks the Finale in this reading, though at times Goldberg transmogrifies the timbres to silver. The (vestigial) harpsichord “continuo” remains tantalizingly audible nearly throughout. Turning back the clock again, listeners can hear Goldberg as a violinist in a string quartet setting—here in a work possibly by Roman Hoffstetter but included in Haydn’s catalog. Since Haydn assigned such a predominant role to the first violin, this work provides a sort of transition to the more balanced chamber works, but Goldberg’s generally self-effacing even in this role, even if he plays the famous second-movement Serenade with delicate though soaring mellifluousness. The Berlin Philharmonic String Quartet consisted of Goldberg and Gilbert Back, violins; Reinhard Wolf, viola; and Nikolai Graudan, cello.


The third disc probes further into Goldberg’s recordings as a chamber musician, but here in Haydn piano trios, in which he’s joined by Lili Kraus and Anthony Pini. All three recordings come from 1939, the first two from August 29 and the third from September 1. Throughout, the buoyancy and homogeneity of the sound seem exemplary, with Goldberg and Pini matching their articulation seamlessly.


Samuel Dushkin’s arrangement of Maria Theresia von Paradis’s popular brief Sicilienne with Árpád Sándor (despite the pitch instability in the recording and the extremely noisy surfaces, it’s eminently worthy of inclusion) leads to a selection of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s celebrated last three violin concertos. I remember a reviewer generations ago mentioning that in these works Szymon Goldberg’s “walking-on-eggs” style topped every other approach. It’s fortunate that Goldberg recorded the first two of these (in G Major and D Major) in 1951 when engineering had made significant advances. Goldberg’s command in the first movement of the G-Major Concerto suggests that if he’d been walking on eggs, all the shells would have broken; and his choice of a bravura cadenza exhibits the same virtuoso flair (and perhaps lack of stylistic appropriateness) as did the one in his recording of Haydn’s C-major Concerto. In the slow movement, despite his overall concinnity, he occasionally digs into low notes with an aggressive bite that, once again, doesn’t seem at all tentative, not to say mincing. Still, it’s overall an elegant reading (with yet another technically involved cadenza, which, of course, he dispatches with aplomb), equal in its way to Arthur Grumiaux’s in this repertoire. He crackles with energy, endowing the central episode with piquant charm. Susskind and the Philharmonia, with which he’d recorded for so many years, provide fresh, sympathetic support; and the engineers have placed the soloist far forward. In all, then, it’s a performance to treasure, if not to take along to the hen-house.


The fourth disc begins with a performance of Mozart’s D-Major Concerto, recorded with the same forces the day after the G-Major work. In the first movement, Goldberg’s bracing, exhibiting again the tendency to punch out isolated lower notes. And the purity of his tone illuminates the cadenza’s opening, while his virtuosity provides fireworks at its end. He’s insinuatingly elegant in the slow movement, bringing the work to a magical conclusion with a breathtakingly nuanced walk up and down the scale. If he ever walked on eggs, he does so in the finale’s principal sections. Parlophone didn’t release Goldberg and Susskind’s performance of the A-Major Concerto, which they recorded first of all, the day before the G-Major work (the included discography by Shuichiro Kawai notes that Testament released it on CD in 1993). Music and Arts includes the earlier reading of that work’s slow movement, recorded by Goldberg, Paul Kletzki, and members of the Berlin Philharmonic on June 23, 1932. In its general outlines, the performance resembles those of the other concertos’ slow movements in the collection. There follow readings of the composer’s two duos for violin and viola, the first, from 1948 with Frederick Riddle and the second, from 1934, with Paul Hindemith. The engineers caught both Goldberg and Riddle at some distance, in a somewhat hollow-sounding ambiance. Of the two, many listeners may find Goldberg the more assertive and the sharper in articulation, at least in the first movement; Riddle seems to come into his own in the finale. Hindemith sounds considerably starchier—and even leaner—from the outset of the Duo in B? Major. The recorded sound from 1935 (which Obert-Thorn obtained from shellacs) exceeds that of the later recording in both clarity and richness. The end of the fourth disc brings the beginning of a series of Mozart’s sonatas from 1935-37 with Lili Kraus (will a further volume bring his partnership in this repertoire with Radu Lupu from 1974?). The first of these, K 296, opens with cyclonic energy, sharply etched rhythms, bright textures, and genial high spirits. Goldberg’s melting tone in the lower registers suffuses a warm glow over the Andante sostenuto ; the finale recalls the energy of the sonata’s first movement.


The fifth disc offers more performances of Mozart’s sonatas, beginning with K 377 in F: Goldberg and Kraus endow the first movement with heady enthusiasm, the slow movement with transparent charm, and the third with a graceful seriousness. Goldberg stays farther in the background when accompanying in the first movement of the popular sonata, K 378, than did Arthur Grumiaux in his benchmark performance with Clara Haskil (or than he himself in the later recording with Lupu). In their exuberant reading of the finale, they begin the trills on the note (Grumiaux and Haskil begin them on the note above). They’re dramatic in the opening of K 379 in G Major and extend the urgency into the second movement. They find sparkling, jewel-like passagework in the first movement of K 380, a romantic reflectiveness—at times, seemingly, almost too strenuous—in the slow movement, and flinty resolve in the third.


The program of Mozart sonatas continues on the sixth disc with K 404 in C Major ( Andante-Allegro ), followed by the comparatively mammoth Sonata in E?-Major, K 481, in a reading that presses hard in its opening movement—and almost equally so in the slow movement, despite the duo’s deliberate tempo. The section of Mozart sonatas ends with an effervescent performance of Fritz Kreisler’s arrangement of the rondo from the “Haffner” Serenade. The recorded sound in all these sonatas almost belies its age in Obert-Thorn’s transfers. There follow performances of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Violin Sonatas No. 2, No. 5, No. 6, No. 9, and No. 10, all with Lili Kraus and all from the 1936 and 1937. In Sonata No. 2, the duo has adjusted, after their sparkling run-through of Mozart sonatas, to Beethoven’s more strenuous style, playing occasionally with dark suggestiveness in the opening movement. They display a rapt intimacy in the second movement and robust thoughtfulness in the finale. Their version of the “Spring” Sonata allows for a stronger breeze than one that will merely rustle the leaves, yet they adopt a flexible approach to rhythms that keep the performance genial. Goldberg’s tone in the slow movement seems particularly honeyed, flowing thickly. He lacks Szigeti’s explosiveness in the Trio of the Scherzo, but keeps the brief movement sounding spirited nonetheless. The duo makes the finale flow smoothly.


The seventh disc completes the readings of the five Beethoven sonatas with No. 6, No. 9, “Kreutzer,” and No. 10. The Sixth Sonata may strike some listeners to this recording as almost lightweight, in both its first movement and even at the beginning of its second. In addition, Goldberg and Kraus sound genial in the theme and variations that bring the sonata to a close; and Goldberg employs a wide variety of broken chords with which the violin interjects itself into the fourth variation. The “Kreutzer” Sonata doesn’t open in Goldberg’s most commanding manner; in fact, it may strike listeners as a somewhat understated prelude to the movement proper—he doesn’t add coal to the furnace until the “Janissary” section. But he and Kraus play with wiry excitement in the final pages. Kraus doesn’t bubble in the slow movement’s first variation; Goldberg slows down for effect here and there, further disturbing the variation’s forward motion (a similar flexibility enhances his reading of the minor variation). The pages of the movement wind down to relaxed warmth. The finale, though strongly accented in many passages, won’t compare in electricity with Jascha Heifetz’s versions, except in some of the statements of the principal theme. It seems that Goldberg, and maybe Kraus, find the 10th Sonata more congenial: They play its lyrical first movement with sympathetic nuance; they strike a note of repose in the second, with Goldberg’s tone sounding almost viscous in its lower registers, and return to their genial manner from the first movement in the Scherzo, sprinting to the end in an unusual burst of energy. The recorded sound varies only a little among all the sonata recordings, both Mozart and Beethoven, and for the most part remains acceptably noise-free and steady.


The last disc offers chamber works, the first and last of which feature a distinguished trio (Goldberg, Paul Hindemith, and Emanuel Feuermann in Beethoven’s Serenade, op. 8) in a performance from 1934 that’s by turns throbbingly rich-toned and resonantly bracing—and overall beguiling—with the recorded sound more realistic than might have been anticipated (this recording appeared on LP as well as on 78s, but the notes indicate shellac pressings as the source for the transfers). There follow some stray movements: the third of Beethoven’s String Quartet, op. 18/5, with the Berlin Philharmonic String Quartet (Goldberg taking the prominent first part), the second of the composer’s Septet, op. 29, with the Berlin Philharmonic Chamber Ensemble, and the Lento of Antonín Dvo?ák’s String Quartet, op. 96, again with the Philharmonic’s String Quartet (all from 1932), and brought to a conclusion by Kreisler’s arrangement of Dvo?ák’s Slavonic Dance in E Minor, with Sándor—also from 1932. Goldberg’s even more loamy than Kreisler himself in his first reading from 1915: he’s ardent, and sharply rhythmic in the middle sections. The final work on the program, Hindemith’s Trio No. 2, is played by Goldberg, Hindemith himself, and Feuermann, from 1934 (transferred, like Beethoven’s Serenade, from shellacs).


Music and Arts released Mozart’s sonatas and duos and Beethoven’s sonatas, three decades ago (in a three-CD set, Music and Arts 664, reviewed in Fanfare 15:3 by both David K. Nelson and Mortimer Frank), noting these performances’ historic nature. David had reviewed a five-CD set on EMI TOSHIBA in Fanfare 15:1. It included Mozart’s concertos and sonatas, Beethoven’s Serenade, Hindemith’s Trio, Haydn’s Concerto, and Bach’s E-Major Concerto. Now all these works have come back, with a facelift by Obert-Thorn. For those who have enjoyed the first eight-disc volume of the “Centenary Edition,” this further set should be obligatory. Violinists should rejoice, for Goldberg certainly amounted to more than his relative anonymity would suggest. Strongly—even urgently—recommended to his admirers, though more casual collectors may find it, like its predecessor, a huge chunk to swallow whole, no matter how delectable.


FANFARE: Robert Maxham
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Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for Violin no 1 in A minor, BWV 1041 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Walter Susskind
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1723; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1951 
2.
Concerto for Violin no 2 in E major, BWV 1042 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Walter Susskind
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1723; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1948 
3.
Brandenburg Concerto no 1 in F major, BWV 1046 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Alois Melichar
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717; ?Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1933 
4.
Brandenburg Concerto no 2 in F major, BWV 1047 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Alois Melichar
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1718; ?Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1932 
5.
Brandenburg Concerto no 3 in G major, BWV 1048 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Alois Melichar
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1711-1713; ?Weimar, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1933 
6.
Concerto for Violin no 1 in C major, H 7a no 1 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Walter Susskind
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1769; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 1947 
7.
Concerto for Violin no 3 in G major, K 216 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Walter Susskind
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1775; Salzburg, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1951 
8.
Concerto for Violin no 4 in D major, K 218 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Walter Susskind
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1775 
Date of Recording: 1951 
9.
Concerto for Violin no 5 in A major, K 219 "Turkish" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Conductor:  Paul Kletzki
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra members
Written: 1775 
Date of Recording: 1932 
10.
Sonata for Violin and Basso Continuo in D major, HWV 371/Op. 1 no 13 by George Frideric Handel
Performer:  Gerald Moore (Piano), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1750; London, England 
Date of Recording: 1947 
11.
Quartets (6) for Strings, Op. 3: no 5 in F major - Excerpt(s) by Roman Hoffstetter
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Philharmonic String Quartet
Date of Recording: 1932 
12.
Trio for Piano, Violin and Cello in F sharp minor, H 15 no 26 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Anthony Pini (Cello), Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Lili Kraus (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795; London, England 
Date of Recording: 1939 
13.
Trio for Piano, Violin and Cello in E flat major, H 15 no 29 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Anthony Pini (Cello), Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Lili Kraus (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795-1797; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1939 
14.
Trio for Piano, Violin and Cello in C major, H 15 no 27 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Anthony Pini (Cello), Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Lili Kraus (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795-1797; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1939 
15.
Sicilienne in E flat major by Maria Theresia Paradis
Performer:  Arpád Sándor (Piano), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: Classical 
Written: Austria 
Date of Recording: 1932 
16.
Duo for Violin and Viola no 1 in G major, K 423 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Frederick Riddle (Viola), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1783; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1948 
17.
Duo for Violin and Viola no 2 in B major, K 424 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Paul Hindemith (Viola), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1783; Salzburg, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1934 
18.
Sonata for Violin and Piano in C major, K 296 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Lili Kraus (Piano), Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1778; Mannheim, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1935 
19.
Sonata for Violin and Piano no 9 in A major, Op. 47 "Kreutzer" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Lili Kraus (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1802-1803; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1936 
20.
Sonata for Violin and Piano no 6 in A major, Op. 30 no 1 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Lili Kraus (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1801-1802; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1936 
21.
Sonata for Violin and Piano no 10 in G major, Op. 96 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Lili Kraus (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1812; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1937 
22.
Serenade for Violin, Viola and Cello in D major, Op. 8 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Emanuel Feuermann (Cello), Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Paul Hindemith (Viola)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1796-1797; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1934 
23.
Quartet for Strings no 5 in A major, Op. 18 no 5: 3rd movement, Andante cantabile by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Philharmonic String Quartet
Date of Recording: 1932 
24.
Septet in E flat major, Op. 20: 2nd movement, Adagio cantabile by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Philharmonic Chamber Ensemble
Period: Classical 
Written: 1800; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1932 
25.
Quartet for Strings no 12 in F major, Op. 96/B 179 "American": Lento by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Philharmonic String Quartet
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1893; USA 
Date of Recording: 1932 
26.
Slavonic Dances (8) for Piano 4 hands, Op. 46/B 78: no 2 in E minor, Dumka by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Arpád Sándor (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1878; Bohemia 
Date of Recording: 1932 
27.
Trio for Strings no 2 by Paul Hindemith
Performer:  Paul Hindemith (Viola), Szymon Goldberg (Violin), Emanuel Feuermann (Cello)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1933; Germany 
Date of Recording: 1934 

Sound Samples

Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041: I. Allegro
Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041: II. Andante
Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041: III. Allegro assai
Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042: I. Allegro
Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042: II. Adagio
Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042: III. Allegro assai
Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F major, BWV 1046: I. Allegro
Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F major, BWV 1046: II. Adagio
Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F major, BWV 1046: III. Allegro
Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F major, BWV 1046: IV. Menuetto - Trio - Menuetto - Polacca - Trio - Menuetto
Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F major, BWV 1047: I. Allegro
Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F major, BWV 1047: II. Andante
Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F major, BWV 1047: III. Allegro assai
Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G major, BWV 1049: I. Allegro
Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G major, BWV 1049: II. Andante
Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G major, BWV 1049: III. Presto
Violin Sonata No. 7 in D major, Op. 1, No. 13, HWV 371: I. Affettuoso
Violin Sonata No. 7 in D major, Op. 1, No. 13, HWV 371: II. Allegro
Violin Sonata No. 7 in D major, Op. 1, No. 13, HWV 371: III. Larghetto
Violin Sonata No. 7 in D major, Op. 1, No. 13, HWV 371: IV. Allegro
Violin Concerto in C major, Hob.VIIa:1: I. Allegro moderato
Violin Concerto in C major, Hob.VIIa:1: II. Adagio
Violin Concerto in C major, Hob.VIIa:1: III. Finale: Presto
String Quartet in F major, Op. 3, No. 5, Hob.III:17, "Serenade" (attrib. to Hoffstetter): I. Presto
String Quartet in F major, Op. 3, No. 5, Hob.III:17, "Serenade" (attrib. to Hoffstetter): II. Serenade: Andante cantabile
String Quartet in F major, Op. 3, No. 5, Hob.III:17, "Serenade" (attrib. to Hoffstetter): III. Menuetto
String Quartet in F major, Op. 3, No. 5, Hob.III:17, "Serenade" (attrib. to Hoffstetter): IV. Scherzando

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