Holiday Shop


WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Alexandre Danilevski: Uncertainty Principle

Danilevski / Toh / Flaunders Recorder Quartet
Release Date: 08/28/2012 
Label:  Carpe Diem   Catalog #: 16291   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Alexandre Danilevski
Performer:  Larissa GroeneveldAkira TachikawaZsuzsanna Toth
Conductor:  Alexandre Danilevski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  SyntagmaFlanders Recorder Quartet
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews



DANILEVSKI Lauda. 1,3 Revelation. 3 Oda an die Traurigkeit. 1-3 Antiphones for Recorder Quartet 1 Zsuzsanna Tóth (sop); 2 Akira Tachikawa (ct); 3 Larissa Groenveld (vc); Flanders Rcr Qrt; Ens Syntagma Read more CARPE DIEM 16291 (57:35 Text and Translation)


This unusual disc, titled The Uncertainty Principle, features works for cello, recorder quartet, and singers by Russian composer Alexandre Danilevski. I put it on after suffering through Bent Lorentzen’s awful Erotic Hymns CD, but not immediately after: in between I listened to the piano works of Roussel. Anyway, when the opening cello drone started, I thought I was stuck back in Lorentzen’s horrible piece Triplex, but it soon opened up into one of the most lovely and imaginative works I had ever heard, Lauda. Based on an anonymous 15th-century text pondering the Universe and its creator, Lauda is an extraordinarily interesting piece combining Renaissance plainchant, Japanese-styled recorder lines, and Meredith Monk-like droning. In short, it was absolutely mesmerizing; and, happily, soprano Tóth has a pure, clear, ear-ravishing voice of great effectiveness.


Revelation is a 12-minute piece for unaccompanied cello: melancholy yet lyrical, again in a pseudo-Oriental fashion, the instrument playing long, arcing lines and ending on an unresolved cadence. In the liner notes, much is made of the composer’s spirituality and his belief that his music should ask more questions than it answers. He does not believe in giving “form” to his music but, on the contrary, to use uncertainty as “both a point of departure and the ultimate reason for creation.” Thus, as Revelation melts into Oda an die Traurigkeit, a four-part sequence of pieces featuring wordless vocals alternating between soprano and countertenor over a droning cello, we hear a realistic, taped thunderclap, perhaps as a means of “awakening” the listener. The second piece in this suite, “Verso, Golden leaves,” opens with what sounds like distant winds, and here the cello and voices are replaced by the recorder quartet. The winds become louder and start to roar during the Interlude, then recede into the background again. A wordless vocal featuring countertenor and cello, then adding the soprano, comprises the final “Farewell: Who now shall refill the cup for me?”


Danilevski prides himself on not writing in traditional forms, and the last piece on this disc, Antiphones, is often performed by his Ensemble Syntagma in conjunction with Terry Riley’s In C, which is comprised of 53 short patterns that the players are asked to recombine according to a set of rules and permissions during its performance. Danilevski firmly believes in “maximum individuality” within an ensemble performance, being completely free yet still “in permanent dialogue with others.” Interestingly, he brings this same aesthetic to his performances of medieval music, claiming that “it sounds terrible when the music is too rehearsed, too much the same. You can sense that the music doesn’t like this same-ness. . . . It requires spontaneity and uncertainty.” It should be said, however, that the instruments are not completely “free” in their musical paths: when the music calls for brisk tempos and technically tricky playing, the musicians are very much “together.” Nevertheless, the enthusiasm that they put into the music is there to hear, and enjoy. Again, plain, simple harmonies underpin the various sections of the work, and there is considerable humor in the final Allegretto. This is an interesting, provocative, and fascinating CD, and I highly recommend it to anyone wishing to explore new musical paths.


FANFARE: Lynn René Bayley
Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Lauda "In memoriam Rachel Beckwith" by Alexandre Danilevski
Performer:  Larissa Groeneveld (Cello), Akira Tachikawa (Countertenor), Zsuzsanna Toth (Soprano)
Conductor:  Alexandre Danilevski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Syntagma
2.
Revelation "In memoriam Alfred Schnittke" by Alexandre Danilevski
Performer:  Larissa Groeneveld (Cello), Akira Tachikawa (Countertenor), Zsuzsanna Toth (Soprano)
Conductor:  Alexandre Danilevski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Syntagma
3.
Oda an die Traurigkeit by Alexandre Danilevski
Performer:  Larissa Groeneveld (Cello), Akira Tachikawa (Countertenor), Zsuzsanna Toth (Soprano)
Conductor:  Alexandre Danilevski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Syntagma
4.
Antiphones for Recorder Quartet by Alexandre Danilevski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Flanders Recorder Quartet

Sound Samples

Lauda: Prelude
Lauda: Part I: Se mai per maraveglia
Lauda: Interlude I
Lauda: Part II: Universal dolore
Lauda: Interlude II
Lauda: Part III: Ser perder la propia vita
Lauda: Interlude III
Lauda: Part IV: Gia le ferrate e inexpugnabil porte
Revelation
Oda an die Traurigkeit: Prelude
Oda an die Traurigkeit: Verse: Golden leaves
Oda an die Traurigkeit: Interlude
Oda an die Traurigkeit: Farewell: Who now shall refill the cuo for me?
Antiphones: I. A piacere (senza tempo)
Antiphones: II. Andante
Antiphones: III. Allegretto

Customer Reviews

Be the first to review this title
Review This Title
Review This Title Share on Facebook




YOU MUST BE A SUBSCRIBER TO LISTEN TO ARKIVMUSIC STREAMING.
TRY IT NOW FOR FREE!
Sign up now for two weeks of free access to the world's best classical music collection. Keep listening for only $19.95/month - thousands of classical albums for the price of one! Learn more about ArkivMusic Streaming
Aleady a subscriber? Sign In