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Mahler: Songs (Arranged by Schoenberg)


Release Date: 10/14/2016 
Label:  Naxos   Catalog #: 8573536  
Composer:  Gustav Mahler
Performer:  Roderick WilliamsSusan PlattsCharles Reid
Conductor:  JoAnn Falletta
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Attacca QuartetVirginia Arts Festival Chamber Players
Number of Discs: 1 
Low Stock: Currently 3 or fewer in stock. Usually ships in 24 hours, unless stock becomes depleted.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

Arnold Schoenberg founded the Society for Private Musical Performances in 1918 to perform contemporary music from "Mahler to the present". Mahler had been an early supporter of Schoenberg's music, and Schoenberg repaid the favor by arranging Mahler's orchestral works for chamber ensemble and including them at the society's concerts. The colorful Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen are given a feel of great intimacy in this form, while the lighter scoring of Das Lied von der Erde has the advantage of clarifying instrumental textures, its magical effects capturing "the finite nature of earthly things". Arnold Schoenberg founded the Society for Private Musical Performances in 1918 to perform contemporary music from "Mahler to the present". Mahler had been an early supporter of Schoenberg's music, and Schoenberg repaid the favor by arranging Mahler's orchestral works for chamber ensemble and including them at the society's concerts. The colorful Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen are given a feel of great intimacy in this form, while the lighter scoring of Das Lied von der Erde has the advantage of clarifying instrumental textures, its magical effects capturing "the finite nature of earthly things". Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen by Gustav Mahler
Performer:  Roderick Williams (Baritone)
Conductor:  JoAnn Falletta
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Attacca Quartet,  Virginia Arts Festival Chamber Players
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1883-1896; Germany 
2.
Das Lied von der Erde by Gustav Mahler
Performer:  Susan Platts (Mezzo Soprano), Charles Reid (Tenor)
Conductor:  JoAnn Falletta
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Attacca Quartet,  Virginia Arts Festival Chamber Players
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1908-1909; Vienna, Austria 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 I admit it; I'm spoiled... June 20, 2017 By James Carleton (Port Hueneme, CA) See All My Reviews "I was listening to KUSC a few weeks back, on my drive home from work, and Jim Svejda had JoAnn Falletta as his guest; not the first time that she's been on his show, either, as she was Music Director of the Long Beach Symphony some time back. In between discussion about whatever, he played samples of various of her recordings, including this one; he must have had an 'advance' copy, as it was not yet available at retail. One of the Wayfarer songs was played, and I was intrigued enough by the re-working of this song, and the discussion about Schoenberg's reasons for doing it, that I decided to buy a copy. Which brings me to the thing about me being spoiled. I own Leonard Bernstein's spectacular recording of Das Leid with the Israel Philharmonic, Christa Ludwig and Rene Kollo, which was made during several concerts in 1972. IMHO, this is *the* reference recording for this piece, at least for mezzo and tenor. Ludwig made several studio recordings of this, but the immediacy of a live audience really brought out the best in her and Kollo. And the Israel is as good as it gets under Bernstein. Let us be frank: Susan Platts sings well, but she is not Christa Ludwig. There is nowhere near the emotional range in this performance, which is odd, because the comparative thinness of the accompaniment should have allowed her to find the softer, more heart-wrenching moments without worrying about not being heard. And Charles Reid, for all that he has a lovely silkiness in his voice, is rather flat in his expression. Kollo bowls you over with his mad gaiety; Reid seems almost not to understand the songs, which might well be the problem. On the plus side, the chamber arrangement is a wonderful change from Mahler's sometimes-overpowering orchestra, and absolutely gorgeous in the final Der Abschied. I have been a fan of JoAnn Falletta for years, and her work here does not disappoint. As for the Wayfarer songs, Roderick Williams is a fine choice: he finds just the right tack throughout, projecting that false light-heartedness over a profound sorrow just on the edge of madness which is required to fully realize these songs. At Naxos' price, it might well be worthwhile to buy this just for the 'Traveling Companion'; it was for me." Report Abuse
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